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Univariate Distributions

  • This site offers separate webpages about statistical topics relevant to those studying psychology such as research design, representing data with graphs, hypothesis testing, and many more elementary statistics concepts.  Homework problems are provided for each section.

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  • Approximating a normal distribution with a binomial distribution

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  • This page supports an in-class exercise that highlights several key Bayesian concepts. The scenario is as follows: a large paper bag contains pieces of candy with wrappings of different color, and we are interested in learning about the unknown proportion of yellow-wrapped pieces of candy. After completing the exercises, we will be familiar with the following concepts and ideas: probability distributions can quantify degree of beliefprior distributionposterior distributionsequential updatingconjugacy, Cromwell’s Rule (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cromwell's_rule), the data overwhelm the prior, Bayes factors, Savage-Dickey density ratio, sensitivity analysiscoherence.

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  • This resource is designed to provide new users to R, RStudio, and R Markdown with the introductory steps needed to begin their own reproducible research. Many screenshots and screencasts (with no audio) will be included, but if further clarification is needed on these or any other aspect of the book, please create a GitHub issue here or email me with a reference to the error/area where more guidance is necessary.  It is recommended that you have R version 3.3.0 or later, RStudio Desktop version 1.0 or higher, and rmarkdown R package version 1.0 or higher. 

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  • These handouts/links give a foundational understanding of how to set up and use R

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  • A joke to aid in discussing probability density functions for continuous random variables.  The joke was written in 2016 by Judah Lesser an AP statistics student from El Paso, Texas.

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  • A game to help with the active learning of the kinds of applied scenarios that are appropriately modeled by distributions covered in an upper division undergraduate or masters level probability course. The game is part of the Distributome.org probability resources developed by Ivo Dinov (University of Michigan), Dennis Pearl (Penn State University), and Kyle Siegrist (University of Alabama).
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  • This is an e-book tutorial for R. It is organized according to the topics usually taught in an Introductory Statistics course. Topics include: Qualitative Data; Quantitative Data; Numerical Measures; Probability Distributions; Interval Estimation; Hypothesis Testing; Type II Error; Inference about Two Populations; Goodness of Fit; Analysis of Variance; Non-parametric methods; Linear Regression; and Logistic Regression.
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  • A joke that can be used in distinguishing the difference between the probability mass function (pmf) for discrete variables and the probability density function (pdf) for continuous variables. The idea for the joke came in 2016 from Judah Lesser, an AP Statistics student from El Paso Texas.
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  • A song to teach about Benford's Law for the probability distribution of first digits in real data. The lyrics are copyright by Lawrence Mark Lesser as a parody of Harry Nilsson's "One" made popular in 1969 by "Three Dog Night". "One is the Likeliest Number" was first published in the Spring 2011 issue of "Teaching Statistics". Free for use in non-profit education settings. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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