Univariate Distributions

  • A game to help with the active learning of the kinds of applied scenarios that are appropriately modeled by distributions covered in an upper division undergraduate or masters level probability course. The game is part of the Distributome.org probability resources developed by Ivo Dinov (University of Michigan), Dennis Pearl (Penn State University), and Kyle Siegrist (University of Alabama).
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  • This is an e-book tutorial for R. It is organized according to the topics usually taught in an Introductory Statistics course. Topics include: Qualitative Data; Quantitative Data; Numerical Measures; Probability Distributions; Interval Estimation; Hypothesis Testing; Type II Error; Inference about Two Populations; Goodness of Fit; Analysis of Variance; Non-parametric methods; Linear Regression; and Logistic Regression.
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  • A joke that can be used in distinguishing the difference between the probability mass function (pmf) for discrete variables and the probability density function (pdf) for continuous variables. The idea for the joke came in 2016 from Judah Lesser, an AP Statistics student from El Paso Texas.
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  • A song to teach about Benford's Law for the probability distribution of first digits in real data. The lyrics are copyright by Lawrence Mark Lesser as a parody of Harry Nilsson's "One" made popular in 1969 by "Three Dog Night". "One is the Likeliest Number" was first published in the Spring 2011 issue of "Teaching Statistics". Free for use in non-profit education settings. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A collection of Statistics related Haikus collected by Nicholas Horton from his Math 190 (statistical Methods for Undergraduate Research) course at Smith College in Spring, 2010. These are included in the Statistics Haiku Project at http://www.math.smith.edu/~nhorton/haikustat.html
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching the difference between how the word random is used in probability compared to some uses in everyday parlance. The cartoon is number 1210 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license
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  • A joke to teach the meaning of type I error by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-) and Ohio State Unviersity PRofessor of Statistics Dennis K. Pearl (1951-).
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  • A joke to use when teaching about choices of binary response data models like the Logistic or Probit models by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).
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  • A cartoon for use in teaching about the Normal distribution. The cartoon was drawn by Australian epidemiologist Matthew Freeman of the Public Health Information Development Unit at the University of Adelaide. It is free for use on course websites or in the classroom provided author acknowledgement is given (e.g. leave copyright statement on the image). Commercial uses should contact the copyright holder. The cartoon was also published under the title "A visual comparison of normal and paranormal distributions" in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health (2006) 60(1):6
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  • The theory of probability is the only mathematical tool available to help map the unknown and the uncontrollable. It is fortunate that this tool, while tricky, is extraordinarily powerful and convenient. is a quote by Polish-French-American mathematician and developer of fractal geometry Benoit B. Mandelbrot (1924 - 2010). The quote appears in his 1982 book "The Fractal Geometry of Nature" W.H. Freeman
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