Webinars

  • Using a Faculty Learning Community to Develop High-Impact, Little-Time Activities to Help Students Better Understand the Meaning of Parameter

    Jennifer J. Kaplan, University of Georgia; Neal Rogness, Grand Valley State University; Diane Fisher, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
    Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 1:00pm
    To event remaining 13 days
    Research on faculty professional development suggests that in order for faculty to change their teaching, they must perceive a problem, be presented with changes they can adapt to their own teaching style, and see evidence of change in student learning based on the changes. Many words in statistics pose a barrier for entry level students because they everyday meanings which differ from their discipline usage within statistics; this can lead to lexical ambiguity for students. The webinar will focus on two High-Impact, Little-Time (HILT) activities developed by faculty involved in a faculty learning community to help exploit lexical ambiguities associated with parameter. We will present the activities, along with the data that show the effectiveness of the activities with respect to student learning.
  • Designing Opportunities to Learn to Teach Statistics: Lessons from a MOOC for Educators

    Hollylynne Lee, NC State University, Friday Institute for Educational Innovation
    Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 2:00pm
    Professional development for educators can be done in a flexible format that meets the needs of teachers of statistics in a variety of contexts. Design principles and sample learning opportunities will be shared that are part of the Teaching Statistics Through Data Investigations MOOC for Educators. The course is offered several times a year and thus far has served over 2500 educators from all 50 states, and over 45 countries. See http://friday.institute/tsdi.
  • Using Media Clips to Introduce Topics in Statistics

    James Bush, Waynesburg University, Waynesburg, PA
    Tuesday, July 12, 2016 - 2:00pm
    This webinar will present several media clips from popular films and television programs and show how they can be used to introduce topics in a first-year statistics course. A simulation-based activity motivated by one of the clips will be demonstrated.
  • Using Hunger Games Data to teach Randomization Tests

    Kyle Caudle, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology
    Tuesday, June 28, 2016 - 2:00pm
    This webinar will discuss an activity-based method for teaching permutation goodness of fit tests. Using statistical analysis and computer simulations, I will explore the possibility that the Gamemakers, those in charge of planning the Hunger Games, fixed the lottery. No previous knowledge of randomization tests will be required for this webinar – previous knowledge of basic hypothesis testing would be helpful.
  • Data Exploration with CODAP

    William Finzer, Concord Consortium
    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 - 2:00pm
    The Common Online Data Analysis Platform (CODAP) is an online, free, and open source descendant of Fathom and TinkerPlots (though still far from a replacement for them). We’ll look at ways you can already use CODAP in the classroom and understand where ongoing development at Concord Consortium will take it.
  • The Bubble Project

    Pamela Fellers, Grinnell College
    Tuesday, April 26, 2016 - 2:00pm
    Many statistics courses incorporate a final project into the semester which typically begins mid-semester with the bulk of the work in the last few weeks. These projects often involve content from the first few weeks of class which students sometimes struggle with application to their final projects (e.g. data collection, numerical and graphical summaries, etc.) This webinar will present an example of how a short-term project has been incorporated into the first few weeks of the class as a way of gaining additional exposure to these early concepts as well as preparing the students for their larger-scale final projects.
  • Teaching Statistics from the Operating Table: Minimally Invasive and Maximally Educational

    Amy Nowacki, Cleveland Clinic and Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
    Wednesday, November 18, 2015 - 12:00pm
    Statistics courses that focus on data analysis in isolation, discounting the scientific inquiry process, may not motivate students to learn the subject. By involving students in other steps of the inquiry process, such as generating hypotheses and data, students may become more interested and vested in the analysis step. Additionally, such an approach might better prepare students to tackle real research questions outside of the statistics classroom. Presented here is a classroom activity utilizing the popular Hasbro board game Operation, which requires student involvement in the entire research process. Highlighted are ways this activity uncovers a number of research issues. A number of categorical and continuous variables are collected, making the activity amenable to a variety of statistical investigations and thus easy to imbed into any curriculum. Designed to mimic a real-world research scenario, this fun activity provides a guided yet flexible research experience from start to finish.
  • Batting for Power

    Allan Rossman and Beth Chance, Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo
    Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 2:00pm
    We present an activity for introducing students to the concept of power and factors that influence power. The activity asks students to use a simulation-based approach, with an applet available here http://www.rossmanchance.com/applets/power.html to investigate how likely a baseball player would be to convince a manager that he has improved his probability of getting a hit.
  • Identifying Statistical Concepts Associated with High and Low Levels of Self-Efficacy to Teach Statistics in Middle Grades

    Leigh M. Harrell-Williams, University of Memphis and Rebecca L. Pierce, Ball State University
    Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 12:00pm
    Based on our March 2015 JSE paper "Identifying Statistical Concepts Associated with High and Low Levels of Self-Efficacy to Teach Statistics in Middle Grades,” we discuss the results of a Rasch modeling analysis of pre-service mathematics teacher responses to the middle grades Self-Efficacy to Teach Statistics (SETS) instrument. We share how we used Rasch measurement theory to develop the middle grades SETS instrument to measure pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy to teach topics at GAISE levels A and B as well as K–8 CCSSM statistics topics. SETS items ask teachers to rate their self-efficacy to teach a particular concept on a Likert scale from 1 (“not confident at all”) to 6 (“completely confident”). From data collected at four public institutions of higher education in the United States, we discuss what statistics topics pre-service teachers felt the most (or least) efficacious about and how that informs our continuing work.
  • Assistive Technologies for Second Year Statistics Students who are Blind

    Rob Erhardt and Michael Shuman, Wake Forest University
    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 12:00pm
    We describe the assistive technologies used to accommodate a blind student who took a second course in statistics at Wake Forest University. The course covered simple and multiple regression, model diagnostics, model selection, data visualization, and elementary logistic regression. These topics required that the student both interpret and produce three sets of materials: mathematical writing, computer programming, and visual displays of data. We relied heavily on integrating the use of multiple existing technologies. Specifically, this talk will detail the extensive use of screen readers, LaTeX, a modified use of R and the BrailleR package, a desktop Braille embosser, and a modified classroom approach.

Pages