Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Univariate Distributions

  • This pdf document contains 7 pages of random number tables and 1 page of instructions for use.
    1
    Average: 1 (1 vote)
  • This online textbook covers the following probability and statistics topics: Independence; Venn Diagrams; Bayes's Theorem; Counting; Binomial Expansion; Binomial Distribution; Continuous Distributions; Infinitesimals in Probability; Averaging; Variance; Gaussian Distribution; Random Walks; Correlation; Causation; Linear Regression; Unbiased Estimators; Hypothesis Testing; Shape of the Distribution; Variance of Mean Differences.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This page explains simple linear regression with an example on muscle strength versus lean body mass.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This page contains applets and data files that supplement the text "Investigating Statistical Concepts, Applications, And Methods." The applets and files are organized according to chapter; each data file is available in Minitab or text format.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The datasets in this collection are in text format, but are also compatible with Arc software from "Regression Graphics." Each set has a title, description, and data table. The software is available in the relation link below.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This tutorial provides a basic introduction to many topics in statistics and probability. Topics include: Sets and subsets, Statistical experiments, Counting, Basic probability rules, Bayes' theorem, Probability distributions, Discrete vs. Continuous, Binomial, Negative Binomial, Hypergeometric, Multinomial, Poisson, Normal, Sampling theory, Central tendency, Variability, Sampling distributions, t Distribution, Chi-Square Distribution, F Distribution, Estimation problems, Hypothesis testing, Power, Survey sampling, Simple random samples, Stratified samples, Cluster samples, Sample size.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Everyday we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. We do things like lock our doors, watch where we walk at night, or avoid walking alone. We take these actions because at some level we are afraid of the possibility of being a victim of crime. Although we may not consciously think about it, these routines may be influenced by a variety of factors. What factors might make some individuals more afraid than others?

    0
    No votes yet
  • The textbook for this course discusses cross-cultural variations in household structure, as well as changes across time in household structure in the United States. The purpose of this exercise is to examine variations in household structure in the United States according to race and historical period. By the end of the exercise students should have a better appreciation of the fact that household structure in the U.S. is very fluid and that changes over time in household structure have not progressed uniformly for all race groups.
    0
    No votes yet
  • In this module you will explore some of the impacts of this immigration by examining the characteristics of the foreign-born population, comparing these characteristics to those of the native born population. You will get a chance to explore where immigrants come from, how the composition of the immigrant population has changed, where immigrants settle, and what they do once they get here. Most importantly, you will have the opportunity to test some key hypotheses drawn from the most popular theory used to explain the incorporation of immigrants into the American social and economic mainstream.
    0
    No votes yet
  • In this module you will have the opportunity to explore the frequency of different types of residential moves carried out by Americans. You will examine some of the basic determinants of residential mobility by looking at variations in different types of mobility by age, marital status, education, and housing tenure. Finally, you will have an opportunity to test hypotheses, drawn from a popular theoretical perspective, about racial differences in residential mobility.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list