Regression

  • It's Just STATA Code To Me is a song written by Dorry Segev of Johns Hopkins University that reflects on a number of issues in biostatistical data analysis. The song may be sung to the tune of Billy Joel's 1980 hit song "It's Still Rock and Roll To Me." The lyrics were written for Marie DIener-West's Biostatistics 653 course at Johns Hopkins that regularly asks students to create songs, videos, and poetry with biostatistics themes.
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  • Inside every nonBayesian there is a Bayesian struggling to get out. is a quote by British Bayesian Statistician Dennis V. Lindley (1923- ). The quote is also cited on page 497 of E.T. Jaynes 2003 book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science".
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  • The idea that the examination of a relatively small number of randomly selected individuals can furnish dependable information about the characteristics of a vast unseen universe is an idea so powerful that only familiarity makes it cease to be exciting Is a quote from American Educational Statistician Helen Mary Walker (1891 - 1983). Helen Walker was the first women to serve as the president of the American Statistical Association and this quote is from her December 27, 1944 presidential address at the 104th annual meeting of the ASA in Washington, D.C. The full address may be found in the "Journal of the American Statistical Association" (1945; vol. 40, #229 p. 1-10).
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  • A cartoon to teach the idea that sampling variability depends on the size of the sample, and not on the size of the population (as long as the sample is a small part of the population). Cartoon drawn by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl. Free to use in the classroom and for course websites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about the use of a placebo to better control experimental studies. Drawn by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea by Dennis Pearl. Free to use in the classroom or on course websites.
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  • A cartoon to teach about the need to think carefully about the assumptions underlying a statistical model (also uses the idea that you can multiply chances for independent events to find the chance that they all occur). Drawn by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis earl. Free to use in the classroom and on course websites.
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  • This webinar, presented by Larry Lesser of University of Texas at El Paso, provided a tour of the new CAUSEWeb fun page, showing some sample songs, jokes, and cartoons. Participants engaged in a discussion of the pedagogical issues involved in teaching with humor and were provided resources and a bibliography on the topic. Watch the webinar to learn how to make learning fun! (recorded April 11, 2006)
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  • Webinar recorded May 9, 2006 presented by Carl Lee of Central Michigan University and hosted by Jackie Miller of The Ohio State University. Do you use hands-on activities in your class? Would you be interested in using data collected by students from different classes at different institutions? Would you be interested in sharing your students' data with others? Does it take more time than you would like to spend in your class for hands-on activities? Do you have to enter the hands-on activity data yourself after the class period? If your answer to any of the above questions is "YES", then, this Real-Time Online Database approach should be beneficial to your class. In this presentation, Dr. Lee (1) introduces the real-time online database (stat.cst.cmich.edu/statact) funded by a NSF/CCL grant, (2) demonstrates how to use the real-time database to teach introductory statistics using two of the real-time activities and (3) shares with you some of the assessment activities including activity work sheets and projects.
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  • Webinar presented by Roger Woodard of North Carolina State University and Ginger Rowell of Middle Tennessee State University and hosted by Jackie Miller of The Ohio State University on June 13, 2006. Many people would like to use online resources in their classrooms. However, the typical online applet does not have supporting materials that allow the teacher to introduce them into the classroom. Instructors that simply point students to a website without specific instructions and planning may find that the students do not achieve the desired learning outcomes from using the applet. In this webinar Dr. Woodard presented a basic framework that instructors can use to plan and implement the use of online materials in the classroom. These are illustrated with examples that have been field tested in courses at NCSU and at MTSU.
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  • July 11, 2006 webinar presented by Jackie Miller, Ohio State University, and David Spohn Hudson High School (first of a two-part webinar). This 30-minute webinar focused on the AP Statistics experience. David Spohn, an experienced AP Statistics teacher discussed the curriculum of AP, insights on his own teaching, and resources that are available to AP Statistics teachers. Dr. Jackie Miller, a table leader for the AP reading, talked about the AP Statistics reading experience from the point of view of a college faculty member, while David Spohn adds in his experiences as a high school reader. (also provided is information on how to get involved in the AP Statistics reading.) The webinar closes with suggestions from participants on what they believe should await AP Statistics students once they reach college.
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