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Regression

  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing situations where the explanatory variable has essentially no predictive power (whether the variables have a statistically significant relationship or not). The cartoon is number 1725 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing the interpretation of a regression equation (for example interpreting the intercept when it is well beyond the range of the data). The cartoon is #1823 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1823. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing the least squares property of the regression line and the lexical ambiguity in the use of the word regression. The cartoon is #1921 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1921. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing correlation, spurious versus causal relationships, and the meaning of residuals (humorously depicting a relationship between residual over historical enrollment levels in grad school and residual levels in the unemployment rate). The cartoon is #1078 in the web comic Piled Higher and Deeper by Panamanian cartoonist Jorge Cham (1976- ): see www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1078. Free for use in classrooms and course websites with acknowledgement (i.e. "Piled Higher and Deeper" by Jorge Cham, www.phdcomics.com)
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  • A game to aid in the active learning of linear regression. TigerSTAT is a three dimensional on-line game where students use the game to collect data and explore models for estimating the age of a Siberian tiger. In this game, students act as researchers on a national preserve where they are expected to catch tigers, collect data, analyze their data (using simple linear regression on transformed data), and draw appropriate conclusions. Instructors also have the option of asking students to read a scientific publication discussing current methods in estimating ages of tigers. The TigetSTAT labs handouts were created by Rod Sturdivant (Ohio State University), Kevin Cummiskey (West Point) and John Jackson (West Point). Tietronix Software developed the game. This resource is part of the Stat2Labs collection.

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    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • A game for use in the active learning of linear regression and sampling biases. TigerSAMPLING is almost identical to TigerSTAT. However in the TigerSAMPLING game there are additional questions that emphasize BIAS and GENERALIZABILITY. These games collect data and explore models for estimating the age of a Siberian tiger. In this game, students act as researchers on a national preserve where they are expected to catch tigers, collect data, analyze their data (using the simple linear regression on transformed data), and draw appropriate conclusions. The TigetSTAT labs handouts were created by Rod Sturdivant (Ohio State University), Kevin Cummiskey (West Point) and John Jackson (West Point). Tietronix Software developed the game. This resource is part of the Stat2Labs collection.
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  • A game to help in the active learning of concepts in experimental design, regression, and significance testing. Shapesplosion is an on-line game in which a person is expected to place specifically shaped pegs into the appropriate holes within a short time period. In this project, students are asked to use the Shapesplosion game to design an experiment and collect data. This game is specifically designed so that students have the opportunity to develop and test their own unique research question. You can leave all the variables blank when you are simply trying out the game, however, if you want to find your score is the database of results, you will need to select the Participant Info box. This resource is particularly suitable for project oriented teaching and is part of the Stat2Labs collection at Grinnell College that includes instructor notes and student handouts created with funding from NSF-DUE grant #1043814 (Shonda Kuiper, PI).
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  • A pun to be used in discussing the concept of regression to the mean. The joke was co-authored in 2017 by Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso) and Dennis Pearl (Penn State University).

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  • This case study starts by the simple comparison of the prices of houses with and without fireplaces and extends the analysis to examine other characteristics of the houses with fireplace that may affect the price as well. The intent is to show the danger of using simple group comparisons to answer a question that involves many variables. The lesson shows the R code for doing this analysis; however, the data and the model could be used with another statistical software.
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  • The textbook, "Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data," by Lock, Lock, Lock, Lock, and Lock, webpage has a collection of data sets which are used in their textbook. Even without the textbook, the variables are well named, and it is relatively easy to tell what the variables represent.
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