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Regression

  • A song for teaching about the importance of penalized regression methods (ridge regression, LASSO, etc...). The song was written by Bradley Turnbull, Joe Usset, Sidd Roy, and Kyle White who, along with Kristin Linn and Jason Osborne, form the North Carolina State University Statistics Department Graduate Student band, "The Fifth Moment". The lyrics may be sung to the tune of the 2008 hit "Shake It" by the American pop group "Metro Station". "Shrink It" also won an honorable mention in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Available for free use in non-profit education settings.
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  • Three Haiku related to regression including the topics of checking assumptions, dealing with non-linear patterns, and partitioning sums of squares. The Haiku were written by Elizabeth Stasny of The Ohio State University and were awarded a tie for second place in the poetry category of the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition.

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  • A joke to teach the meaning of "significance" written in 2011 by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).

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  • A cartoon to use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolation in the context of predicting the future. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • Regression to the Mean is a 2009 poem and animation by Andrew Porter of Wirral, England. The poem is also available at the author's website (www.inkptamus.com) in a longer version that focuses more on issues in medicine. The poem can be used in teaching about regression to the mean and the regression fallacy. Free for use in non-profit educational settings.
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  • For anyone who wants to know more about what an actuary does or how to become an actuary (including a comprehensive list of colleges with actuarial programs), this is an excellent resource.

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  • This site is a collection of information about references to mathematics (and probability/statistics) in fiction. Users can see an entire list (sorted by author, title or publication date)and can browse through the database to find references by genre, topic, motif or medium.

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  • In this module, students can test their knowledge of levels of measurement by attempting to determine the the level of measurement of ten different variables. For each variable, a statement is also provided and students can indicate whether the statement about the variable is valid or invalid (given the way in which the variable was measured). There is also a brief "refresher" included here about levels of measurement.

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  • May 25, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Ivan Ramler, St. Lawrence University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar discusses an undergraduate Mathematical Statistics course project based on the popular video game Guitar Hero. The project included: 1) developing an estimator to address the research objective "Are notes missed at random?", 2) learning bootstrapping techniques and R programming skills to conduct hypothesis tests and 3) evaluating the quality of the estimator(s) under certain sets of scenarios.

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  • June 22, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Paul Roback, St. Olaf College and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. This webinar describes an in-class activity, motivated by Case Study 1.1.1 in The Statistical Sleuth, in which students compose haiku poems about statistics. Their poems are used to introduce two-sample t-tests and randomization tests. In addition, the in-class experiment leads to good discussion about experimental design issues, where students compare our design to the actual experiment described in Amabile et al.(1985) "Motivation and Creativity: Effects of Motivational Orientation on Creative Writers", Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 48(2): 393-399. I use this activity on the first day of our second course in applied statistics (Statistical Modeling), but it could easily be used in an introductory course as well. Examples of haiku poems which have resulted from this activity can be found under CAUSEweb > Resources > Fun > Poem (direct link), or at www.causeweb.org/cwis/SPT--FullRecord.php?ResourceId=1883.

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