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Regression

  • A song to aid in discussing the idea that the regression line is itself random and understanding the idea of the standard deviation of the estimated slope. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2015 hit song “Hello,” by English singer Adele. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJgYTKsVYQw

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  • A song to be used in discussing the idea that the point of averages (x-bar, y-bar) always lies on the regression line. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2014 hit “Shake it Off,” by Taylor Swift. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeVR2024dY0

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  • A song that may be used in discussing the interpretation of the Y-intercept in a simple linear regression and the idea that the estimated Y-intercept may not make sense in the context of the problem (for example, taking impossible values or when X can never be zero) . The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2013 song “Wrecking Ball,” by Miley Cyrus. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNw4B71UsqY

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  • A song that may be used in discussing the interpretation of the slope in a simple linear regression. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the theme song from the 1960’s television program The Addams Family written by composer Vic Mizzy. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGVj5p55REk

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  • A song to be used in discussing the Regression Effect and the Regression Fallacy.  The lyrics were written by Lawrence M. Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of the 1977 song "Slip Slidin' Away" by Paul Simon. The song first appeared in the August 2017 Amstat News.

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  • A joke that might be used in a discussion of the problem of using a simple linear regression to extrapolate beyond the range of the data (where it is unlikely that the linear relationship would continue to hold). The joke was written by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the selection of the best explanatory variable in a regression model. The cartoon was used in the March 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Michele Balik-Meisner, a student at North Carolina State University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. A second winning entry, by Michael Posner of Villanova University, may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/variable-wheel-ii Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the March competition included “No no no! You randomize AFTER you select your research topic!” by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia; “This isn't what I meant by random variable!” by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso; and “We find this method of finding 'significant' predictors to be quicker than using stepwise regression and it is even slightly more reproducible.” by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the selection of the best explanatory variable in a regression model. The cartoon was used in the March 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Michael Posner, from Villanova University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. A second winning entry, by Michele Balik-Meisner, a student at North Carolina State University, may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/variable-wheel-i Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the March competition included “No no no! You randomize AFTER you select your research topic!” by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia; “This isn't what I meant by random variable!” by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso; and “We find this method of finding 'significant' predictors to be quicker than using stepwise regression and it is even slightly more reproducible.” by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University.
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  • A joke to help in recalling the purpose of Correlation and Regression. The joke was written in 2017 by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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  • A video for use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolating well beyond the range of the data in linear regression. The lyrics and Powerpoint components of the video were written by Michael Posner while the vocals were done by Reena Freedman of Villanova University and won first place in the video category of the 2017 A-mu-sing contest. The lyrics parody the song "How Far I'll Go" from the Disney animated feature film Moana (sung by Alessia Cara for the movie soundtrack).
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    Average: 5 (1 vote)

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