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Regression

  • The goal of this text is to provide a broad set of topics and methods that will give students a solid foundation in understanding how to make decisions with data. This text presents workbook-style, project-based material that emphasizes real world applications and conceptual understanding. Each chapter contains:

    • An introductory case study focusing on a particular statistical method in order to encourage students to experience data analysis as it is actually practiced.
    • guided research project that walks students through the entire process of data analysis, reinforcing statistical thinking and conceptual understanding.
    • Optional extended activities that provide more in-depth coverage in diverse contexts and theoretical backgrounds. These sections are particularly useful for more advanced courses that discuss the material in more detail. Some Advanced Lab sections that require a stronger background in mathematics are clearly marked throughout the text.
    • Data sets from multiple disciplines and software instructions for Minitab and R.

    The text is highly adaptable in that the various chapters/parts can be taken out of order or even skipped to customize the course to your audience. Depending on the level of in-class active learning, group work, and discussion that you prefer in your course, some of this work might occur during class time and some outside of class. 

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  • CODAP provides an easy-to-use web-based data analysis platform, geared toward middle and high school students, and aimed at teachers and curriculum developers. CODAP can be incorporated across the curriculum to help students summarize, visualize and interpret data, advancing their skills to use data as evidence to support a claim.

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  • A joke to be used in discussing the issue of regression to the mean.  Note that the word "meme" is pronunced like "meem." The joke was written in 2017 by Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso) and Dennis Pearl (Penn State University).

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  • A song for use in discussing the interpretation of the root mean squared error – or the standard deviation of the residuals. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may to be sung to the tune of Michael Jackson’s 1982 hit song “Billy Jean.” Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RW-Rfn86CSQ

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  • A song to aid in discussing the idea that the regression line is itself random and understanding the idea of the standard deviation of the estimated slope. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2015 hit song “Hello,” by English singer Adele. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJgYTKsVYQw

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  • A song to be used in discussing the idea that the point of averages (x-bar, y-bar) always lies on the regression line. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2014 hit “Shake it Off,” by Taylor Swift. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XeVR2024dY0

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  • A song that may be used in discussing the interpretation of the Y-intercept in a simple linear regression and the idea that the estimated Y-intercept may not make sense in the context of the problem (for example, taking impossible values or when X can never be zero) . The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 2013 song “Wrecking Ball,” by Miley Cyrus. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNw4B71UsqY

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  • A song that may be used in discussing the interpretation of the slope in a simple linear regression. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the theme song from the 1960’s television program The Addams Family written by composer Vic Mizzy. Also, an accompanying video may be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGVj5p55REk

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  • A song to be used in discussing the Regression Effect and the Regression Fallacy.  The lyrics were written by Lawrence M. Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of the 1977 song "Slip Slidin' Away" by Paul Simon. The song first appeared in the August 2017 Amstat News.

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  • A joke that might be used in a discussion of the problem of using a simple linear regression to extrapolate beyond the range of the data (where it is unlikely that the linear relationship would continue to hold). The joke was written by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.
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