Regression

  • This page will calculate the lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval for a proportion, according to two methods described by Robert Newcombe, both derived from a procedure outlined by E. B. Wilson in 1927. The first method uses the Wilson procedure without a correction for continuity; the second uses the Wilson procedure with a correction for continuity.
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  • To assess the significance of any particular instance of r, enter the values of N[>6] and r into the designated cells, then click the 'Calculate' button. Application of this formula to any particular observed sample value of r will accordingly test the null hypothesis that the observed value comes from a population in which rho=0.
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  • The following pages calculate r, r-squared, regression constants, Y residuals, and standard error of estimate for a set of N bivariate values of X and Y, and perform a t-test for the significance of the obtained value of r. Values of X and Y are entered directly into individual data cells. This page will also work with samples of any size, though it will be rather unwieldy with samples larger than about N=50. As the page opens, you will be prompted to enter the value of N.
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  • This page has two calculators. One will cacluate a simple logistic regression, while the other calculates the predicted probability and odds ratio. There is also a brief tutorial covering logistic regression using an example involving infant gestational age and breast feeding. Please note, however, that the logistic regression accomplished by this page is based on a simple, plain-vanilla empirical regression.
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  • The applets in this section of Statistical Java allow you to see how levels of confidence are achieved through repeated sampling. The confidence intervals are related to the probability of successes in a Binomial experiment. The main page gives the equation for finding confidence intervals and describes the parameters (p, n, alpha). Each applet allows you to change a different parameter and simulate sampling to demonstrate the long run proportion of intervals that contain the true probability of success. The applets are available from a pull-down menu at the bottom of the page. This page was formerly located at http://www.stat.vt.edu/~sundar/java/applets/CI.html
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