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Regression

  • The only statistics you can trust are those you falsified yourself is a quote attributed to former British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965). However scholars at the Churchill Centre (www.winstonchurchill.org) can not find this quote in any of Winston Churchill's books, articles, or speeches.
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  • In this free online video program, "students will advance from histograms through smooth curves to normal curves, and finally to a single normal curve for standardized measurement, as this program shows ways to describe the shape of a distribution using progressively simpler methods. In a lesson on creating a density curve, students also learn why, under steadily decreasing deviation, today's baseball players are less likely to achieve a .400 batting average." This individual video is accessed by scrolling down to the "Individual Program Descriptions - 4. Normal Distributions" and click the "VOD" icon at the top-right of the description.
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  • This chapter of the NIST Engineering Statistics handbook presents information on the statistical modeling of an engineering process. It contains an introduction, discussion of the assumptions, information about data collection and analysis, a discussion of what can be concluded from different process models, and case studies.
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  • A project of the International Association of Statistics Education (IASE). After a first phase of the project led by the outstanding work of Carol Blumberg, where the emphasis was in the development of a series of webpages that will provide users throughout the world with a data bank of international statistical literacy resources for all audiences and in several languages, ISLP is now moving one step ahead. Besides continuing collecting web-based statistical literacy resources from all over the world, ISLP now actively organizes and promotes statistical literacy activities throughout the world and gets actively involved in other worlwide projects. The webpage is a forum where everyone can edit and enter their statistics literacy resources and participate in discussions.
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  • This lesson deals with the statistics of political polls and ideas like sampling, bias, graphing, and measures of location. As quoted on the site, "Upon completing this lesson, students will be able to identify and differentiate between types of political samples, as well as select and use statistical and visual representations to describe a list of data. Furthermore, students will be able to identify sources of bias in samples and find ways of reducing and eliminating sampling bias." A link to a related worksheet is included.
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  • This is a virtual linear regression calculator. It allows students to enter data points, experiment with where the line of best fit might be, and then lets them see the correct line of best fit as well as the outliers. You can click through the introduction.
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  • Here one finds a collection of applets and famous problems in probability (as well as other areas of mathematics such as calculus and geometry). Some of the topics/problems include: Bertrand's Paradox, Birthday Coincidence, Buffon's Needle (Noodle), Lewis Carroll's Problem, Monty Hall Dilemma, Parrondo Paradox, and Three pancakes problem.

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  • This website provides lesson plans, activities, a problem bank, and links to references that meet NCTM standards for probability.
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  • This section of the Engineering Statistics Handbook describes in detail the process of choosing an experimental design to obtain the results you need. The basic designs an engineer needs to know about are described in detail.
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  • The ninth chapter of an online Introduction to Biostatistics course. Lecture notes and links for futher reading are provided.
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