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  • A song to teach about Benford's Law for the probability distribution of first digits in real data. The lyrics are copyright by Lawrence Mark Lesser as a parody of Harry Nilsson's "One" made popular in 1969 by "Three Dog Night". "One is the Likeliest Number" was first published in the Spring 2011 issue of "Teaching Statistics". Free for use in non-profit education settings. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song to help students confront the "equiprobability bias". Lyrics and music were written by Lawrence Mark Lesser of University of Texas at El Paso. The song won an honorable mention in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for use in non-profit education settings.

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  • A song for teaching about the importance of penalized regression methods (ridge regression, LASSO, etc...). The song was written by Bradley Turnbull, Joe Usset, Sidd Roy, and Kyle White who, along with Kristin Linn and Jason Osborne, form the North Carolina State University Statistics Department Graduate Student band, "The Fifth Moment". The lyrics may be sung to the tune of the 2008 hit "Shake It" by the American pop group "Metro Station". "Shrink It" also won an honorable mention in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Available for free use in non-profit education settings.

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  • This page will perform basic multiple regression analysis for the case where there are several independent predictor variables, X1, X2, etc., and one dependent or criterion variable, Y. Requires import of data from a spreadsheet.

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  • This activity enables students to learn about confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for a population mean. It focuses on the t-distribution, the assumptions for using it, and graphical displays. The activity also focuses on how to interpretations a confidence interval, a p-value, and a hypothesis test.

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  • Song addresses the value of a scientific poll. May be sung to the tune of the Rolling Stones' hit "It's Only Rock 'N Roll (But I Like It)" by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards. Musical accompaniment realizationare by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • This collection of case studies includes the following topics: Stock Prices; Breast Cancer Research; Effect of Fitness Program; Water Use in Los Angeles; Oral Hygiene in the ICS-II project; Brinks vs NYC; Effect of Exercise on Heart Disease; National Assessment of Educational Progress; The London Underground; Suicides of Women and Men; Temperature in San Francisco; Lead Intake; Voting for Johnson; Salaries of Yale Men; K-Mart Cookie Sales; Skeleton Differences between Tribes; Advertising for Detergents; Did Mendel Fudge his Data; Rainfall in the United Kingdom; Jury selection in Alameda County; Racial Bias in Jury Selection: Swain vs Alabama.; Gender Bias in Jury Selection: The Case of Dr. Spock.; The ELISA test for the AIDS Virus.; School Careers in the Netherlands in 1959.; The Northridge Earthquake of January 1994.; The Trial of the Pix.

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  • A joke about the over-use of playing card examples in teaching probability.

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  • That was why statistics had to be invented - because people were so unstable and irrational, taken one at a time. A quote of American science fiction author Raymond F. Jones (1915 - 1994) found in his 1956 short story "The Non-Statistical Man". The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • ... we must remember that measures were made for man and not man for measures. a quote of popular science and science fiction author Isaac Asimov (1920 - 1992) in "Of Time and Space and Other Things" page 143, Avon Books, 1965. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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