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  • A cartoon for use in celebrations of Random Acts of Kindness Day which is an unofficial holiday in many countries typically celebrated in February. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on the suggested illustrating text and concept from Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso). The cartoon was first displayed on the website http://www.worldofstatistics.org on Random Acts of Kindness day in February 2014. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites or other non-profit teaching uses.

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  • STATS magazine contains many articles that may be of interest to students of statistics and educators. Articles vary from those that are meant to teach and inform about different concepts and ideas to those that provide ideas for how to teach important topics to others. Some issues also include interesting data sets and information about ways to become more involved in the greater Statistics community.

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  • A cartoon to instigate discussions on the use of random numbers in both designing and analyzing data.The cartoon was used in the October 2018 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was written by Anthony Bonifonte from Denison University. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon to be used in class discussions that introduce basic queueing theory. The cartoon was used in the August, 2017 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon to aid in discussing Simpson's paradox by providing an illustration that an association seen in smaller groups can reverse direction when the data are aggregated. The cartoon was drawn by Britsh cartoonist John Landers based on idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon to be used as a vehicle to discuss Cornfield’s simple conditions required of a potential confounder to create a Simpson's Paradox situation The cartoon was used in the June 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University.

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  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about Bayes Theorem (an obvious follow-up exercise is to ask what “P(C)” would have to be to make the “Modified Bayes Theorem” correct). The cartoon is number 2059 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

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  • A cartoon to be used for in discussing the Poisson model for the number of rare events in a fixed amount of time. The cartoon was used in the August 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This caption received an honorable mention. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The winning caption  in the August competition was "Always read the full informed consent document before signing up to be in a matched-pairs experiment," written by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University and may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/twins

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  • A joke to help in discussing the Geometric and Hypergeometric probability distributions.  A version of the joke was submitted to AmStat News by Sara Venkatraman, a student at Cornell University and appeared in the October, 2018 issue.  The joke was modified to relate the hypergeometric distribution to sampling without replacement by the CAUSEweb fun collection editors (Dennis Peaaerl and Larry Lesser).

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  • A statistics realted lightbulb joke connected to a key percentile of the normal curve.

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