Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Advanced Search | Displaying 61 - 70 of 1079
  • The page will calculate the following: Exact binomial probabilities, Approximation via the normal distribution, Approximation via the Poisson Distribution. This page will calculate and/or estimate binomial probabilities for situations of the general "k out of n" type, where k is the number of times a binomial outcome is observed or stipulated to occur, p is the probability that the outcome will occur on any particular occasion, q is the complementary probability (1-p) that the outcome will not occur on any particular occasion, and n is the number of occasions.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Given a sample of N values of X randomly drawn from a normally distributed population, this page will calculate the .95 and .99 confidence intervals (CI) for the estimated mean of the population.

    0
    No votes yet
  • In this free online video program, "students will discover how to convert the standard normal and use the standard deviation; how to use a table of areas to compute relative frequencies; how to find any percentile; and how a computer creates a normal quartile plot to determine whether a distribution is normal. Vehicle emissions standards and medical studies of cholesterol provide real-life examples."

    0
    No votes yet
  •  The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a Monte Carlo simulation-based tool designed to quantify the probability of the medical risks and potential consequences that astronauts could experience during a mission. In this activity, students will use Monte Carlo methods with a TI-Nspire™ to simulate and predict probabilities of CO2 headaches aboard the ISS. 

    NASA's Math and Science @ Work project provides challenging supplemental problems for students in advanced science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM classes including Physics, Calculus, Biology, Chemistry and Statistics, along with problems for advanced courses in U.S. History and Human Geography.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests. The joke was written in 2013.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to use when teaching about choices of binary response data models like the Logistic or Probit models by University of Texas at El Paso professor of Mathematical Sciences, Lawrence Mark Lesser (1964-).

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching the difference between how the word random is used in probability compared to some uses in everyday parlance. The cartoon is number 1210 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license

    3
    Average: 3 (1 vote)
  • There is no such thing as luck; there is only adequate or inadequate preparation to cope with a statistical universe. is a quote by American Science fiction writer Robert Anson Heinlein (1907-1988). The quote appears at the begiining of section 2 of his 1958 serialized novel "Have Space Suit - Will Travel".

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon for use in celebrations of Random Acts of Kindness Day which is an unofficial holiday in many countries typically celebrated in Febraury. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on the suggested illustrating text and concept from Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso). The cartoon was first displayed on the website http://www.worldofstatistics.org on Random Acts of Kindness day in February 2014. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites or other non-profit teaching uses.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song to teach about Benford's Law for the probability distribution of first digits in real data. The lyrics are copyright by Lawrence Mark Lesser as a parody of Harry Nilsson's "One" made popular in 1969 by "Three Dog Night". "One is the Likeliest Number" was first published in the Spring 2011 issue of "Teaching Statistics". Free for use in non-profit education settings. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages