High School

  • Sep 27, 2017 - 9:30pm
    Dane Camp, PhD, Elmhurst College (IL)

    Throughout nearly a score of years teaching AP calculus and college calculus, I have composed a number of songs to introduce, summarize, and solidify concepts. Not only do songs help pedagogically, they create an atmosphere of joy and excitement in the classroom. I will not only share songs that cover major topics in calculus, we will also discuss the fill in the blank method along with ways you can have students compose songs "live." Be prepared to sing along!

  • Sep 26, 2018 - 2:55pm
    Tiffany Getty, Wilkes University

    Music has long been recognized as an effective tool to help young children learn, but this teaching/learning strategy is rarely used at the high school and college levels. As a doctoral student of education (and a high school chemistry teacher) I am currently in the beginning stages of exploring topics to research for a dissertation. At this point in the process, the only idea I am passionate about is the general concept of using music to teach and learn STEM-related content. However, below I have included a few areas of possible research interest with respect to this general topic.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 7:50pm
    Greg Crowther (Everett Community College)

    Encouraging students to express themselves via their own music surely promotes inclusiveness and equity in the classroom. Do these benefits also occur when the instructor writes or chooses the music, which is perhaps more common?

  • Sep 27, 2017 - 5:30pm
    Sara Slagle and Eric Modlin, Fort Collins High School and Front Range Community College (CO)

    We are a group of high school math teachers (and college math professors) that encourage the use of song to teach math concepts. We are specifically passionate about supporting girls in STEM classes and careers. We have made 4 videos now, and some are really gaining attention on YouTube. In our presentation, we will discuss how the songs we choose help facilitate math learning and promote excitement in math class.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 5:25pm
    Jason Wessels (Eastlake High School, Sammamish WA), Jennifer Breckler (San Francisco State U.), Lawrence Lesser (University of Texas at El Paso), Gregory Crowther (Everett Community College)

    The possible benefits of using music to enhance learning of STEM content are numerous, diverse, and largely unproven. We sought to determine which of these possible benefits are most likely to be experienced by undergraduate students, and perhaps most worthy of further investigation. 440 students in eight physiology courses at two mid-sized American universities were asked to rate the usefulness of five short instructor-penned physiology songs, and to explain why these songs would or would not be useful study aids.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 7:05pm
    Greg Crowther (Everett Community College); Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso)

    Thousands of STEM songs exist (the singaboutscience.org database alone has over 7000), but they vary widely in how readily a teacher can use them in her class. For some teachers, it may be enough that a song exists on the learning objective at hand, but for (probably, most) teachers, a song is not a self-contained lesson and it makes a huge difference if the song is supported by accompanying resources.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 8:15pm
    Chris Johnson (University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire)

    In this session, we introduce Deltaphone, a browser-based blocks programming language for generating musical scores. Just as learners used Logo's turtle geometry to explore mathematical space in a relative way, learners use Deltaphone's interval-based motion to explore musical space. The emphasis on intervals means that certain computational and musical ideas can be investigated quite naturally in code. For example, musical structures can be more easily abstracted into functions and reused in a variety of musical contexts, and custom chords and progressions can be built.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 6:35pm
    Lawrence Herklots (King Edward VI School, Southampton, UK); Oliver Leaman (Blundell's School, Devon, UK)

    Between 2005 and 2017, three musical theatre productions were self-penned and produced, all promoting understanding of key concepts in the historical and theoretical development of Physics. This session will outline some of the successes this approach to pedagogy has had and the extent to which musical theatre can enable the understanding and enjoyment of complex concepts in the teaching and learning of Physics, as well giving all those involved an understanding that creativity and imagination are behind all intellectual and artistic endeavours.

    The works discussed will include:

  • Sep 23, 2019 - 6:55pm
    Alexandra Foran & Dianne Goldsby (Texas A&M University)

    The presentation will demonstrate the use of music to introduce beginning statistics topics, using an "oldie but goodie" song. The demonstration illustrates how to engage students actively in counting, frequency tables, and graphs - counting words, phrases or musical beats; recording these; and creating graphs to display the generated data. Then, the activity examines using a more recent song appropriate for grade levels 6 – 10 (depending on course set-up) or pre-service teachers to create a frequency table and graph of the data.

  • Sep 22, 2019 - 5:45pm
    Jessica Levine (Eckstein Middle School, Seattle WA)

    Understanding the three types of heat transfer and the rule of heat flow is paramount to mastery of thermodynamics. How can 6th graders master these concepts? Of course, sing about them. Seeing an obvious witty connection to use CCR to teach CCR terms, veteran middle school physical science teacher Jessica Levine created her first parody song for her students. This video poster presentation will include philosophy for engaging middle level students with songs for science content, and why this methodology sticks.