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Measures of Location

  • A song for use in helping students to reason about mean and median and the effect of an outlier.  Lyrics & Music © 2016 Amy Adler. This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • This website provides a comprehensive overview of descriptive statistics (mean/median/mode, range, standard deviation, and variance) through informative webpages with examples, links to data sets, and problems for the readers to try for themselves.

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  • A song to be used in discussing how the mean and standard deviation work well in describing symmetric distributions while the median and IQR are valuable when you need more resistant measures for skewed distributions. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of “Faithfully,” the 1983 ballad by the band Journey. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8lry78zBWE See also the companion song “Which Measure and Spread to Use” also written by Mary McLellan with the same learning objective.

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  • A song to be used in discussing how the mean and standard deviation work well in describing symmetric distributions while the median and IQR are valuable when you need more resistant measures for skewed distributions. The lyrics were written by Mary McLellan from Aledo High School in Aledo, Texas as one of several dozen songs created for her AP statistics course. The song may be sung to the tune of the 1976 pop song “Dancing Queen,” by ABBA. Also, an accompanying video may be found at
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5-wg3OYUIE See also the companion song “Which Measure Should I Choose” also written by Mary McLellan with the same learning objective.

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  • A video to teach about the central limit theorem and various issues in one-sample hypothesis testing. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1988 song "I'm Gonna Be (500 miles)" by the Scottish band The Proclaimers. The video took second place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • A video to dispel myths about Statistics and excite students early in a course. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 2000 song "Where Are You, Christmas? " written by James Horner and Will Jennings for the movie "How the Grinch Stole Christmas". The video received an honorable mention in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
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  • A joke for use in discussing measures of central tendency. The joke was written by Jackie Bryce Miller, University of Michigan and won third place in the 2015 A-Mu-Sing competition.
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  • This is a song suitable for middle school level statistics in reinforcing key elements of the scientific method. College-level use might include playing before a lecture to lighten the mood while setting up. The song's lyrics and music were composed by Jeff Hall audio file is a performance by the scientific jam band (see www.scientificjam.com/scijam2.htm)
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  • A fun song about the average by American humorist and singer-songwriter Carla Ulbrich. The song is also available at www.theacousticguitarproject.com/artist/carla-ulbrich/ and more about the singer can be found at her website at www.carlau.com. For classroom use, you might ask which lines in "Totally Average Woman" refer to ways in which the woman in the song is at the mean, and which refer to ways in which she is at the median. Permission from singer is for free use for teaching in classroom and course websites with attribution. Commercial users must contact the copyright holder.
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  • A song to teach about when the mean versus the median is better for describing a distribution. The lyric was authored by Lawrence Mark Lesser from the University of Texas at El Paso. The song may be sung to the tune of Taylor Swift's Grammy winning 2010 hit "Mean". Free for use in non-commercial teaching.
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