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Elementary Probability

  • This applets on this site include: interactive graphs of many distribution models; a collection of computer generated games; a collection of data modeling aids including curve fitting, wavelets, matrix manipulations, etc.; p-values, quantiles & tail-probabilities calculations; virtual online probability experiments and demonstrations; and a large collection of statistical techniques for online data analysis, visualization, and integration.

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  • The Marble Game is a "concept model" demonstrating how a binomial distribution evolves from the occurence of a large number of dichotomous events. The more events (marble bounces) that occur, the smoother the distribution becomes.
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  • This is an exercise in interpreting data that is generated by a phenomenon that causes the data to become biased. You are presented with the end product of this series of events. The craters occur in size classes that are color-coded. After generating the series of impacts, it becomes your assigned task to figure out how many impact craters correspond to each of the size class categories.
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  • This online, interactive lesson on probability spaces provides examples, exercises, and applets that cover conditional probability, independence, and several modes of convergence that are appropriate for random variables. This section also covers probability space, the paradigm of a random experiment and its mathematical model as well as sample spaces, events, random variables, and probability measures.

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  • This journal article describes a set of experiments in which different methods of teaching Bayes' Theorem were compared to each other. The frequency representation of the rule was found to be easier to learn than the probability representation.
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  • This page introduces the definition of sufficient statistics and gives two examples of the use of factorization to prove sufficiency.
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  • This applet allows you to experience the fate of a gambler by simulating the whole gambling session in a matter of seconds. The applet plots the successive rises and falls of the capital during the whole duration of the game. It also displays the maximum and minimum values attained by the capital during the session and allows you to get precise information (by clicking at a point of the histogram) of the amount of capital after that particular bet.
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  • This page has links to an explanation of the applet and to the applet itself. It is a simulation of the T.V. game show. There are three doors to choose from and after making a choice, one of the other doors is revealed. The player can choose to pick the other unopened door or stay with their original choice. Afterwards the statistics of previous contestants are shown. (Note: the applet statistics are inaccurate)
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  • This is a collection of applets including Let's Make A Deal, Let's Make a Deal II, Monkey Words, Entropy, Vigenere, Rectangular Transposition, and Monoalphabetic Substitution.
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  • This applet doesn't have more explanation than - Let's Make a Deal II- An applet to demo at the UCLA conference. It has statistics for a number of tries at a time with choices for whether or not the host knows what is behind the door and whether or not the contestant switches doors after primary choice.
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