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Elementary Probability

  • This presentation is a part of a series of lessons on the Analysis of Categorical Data. This lecture covers the following: partial/conditional tables, confounding, types of independence (mutual, joint, marginal, and conditional), identifiability constraints, partial odds ratios, hierarchical log-linear model, pairwise interaction log-linear model, conditional independence log-linear model, goodness of fit, and model building.

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  • This presentation is a part of a series of lessons on the Analysis of Categorical Data. This lecture covers the following: conditional independence, log-linear models for 2x2 tables, expected counts, logistic regression, odds ratio, parameters of interest for different designs and the MLEs, poisson log-linear model, double dichotomy, the multinomial, and the multinomial log-linear model.

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  • This presentation is a part of a series of lessons on the Analysis of Categorical Data. This lecture covers the following: Pearson's residuals and rules for partitioning an I x J contingency tables as ways to determine association between variables.

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  • This presentation is a part of a series of lessons on the Analysis of Categorical Data. This lecture covers the following: linear association, correlation coefficient, ridits/modified ridits, nonparametric methods, Cochran-Armitage Trend test, 

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  • This presentation is a part of a series of lessons on the Analysis of Categorical Data. This lecture covers the following: uncertainty coefficient, ordinal trends, the gamma statistic and linear association, conditional independence, marginal independence, and Simpson's Paradox.

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  • A song for use in helping students to apply Bayes Theorem and examine marginal and conditional proportions in a table to see how, for rare conditions, most positive test results may be false positives.  Lyrics and music by Tom Toce copyright 2015.  This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • How can we accurately model the unpredictable world around us? How can we reason precisely about randomness? This course will guide you through the most important and enjoyable ideas in probability to help you cultivate a more quantitative worldview.

    By the end of this course, you’ll master the fundamentals of probability and random variables, and you’ll apply them to a wide array of problems, from games and sports to economics and science.  This course includes 62 interactive quizzes and more than 400 probabilty-based problems with solutions.  Access to this course requires users to sign up for a free account.

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  • This site offers separate webpages about statistical topics relevant to those studying psychology such as research design, representing data with graphs, hypothesis testing, and many more elementary statistics concepts.  Homework problems are provided for each section.

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  • Statistics and probability concepts are included in K–12 curriculum standards—particularly the Common Core State Standards—and on state and national exams. STEW provides free peer-reviewed teaching materials in a standard format for K–12 math and science teachers who teach statistics concepts in their classrooms.

    STEW lesson plans identify both the statistical concepts being developed and the age range appropriate for their use. The statistical concepts follow the recommendations of the Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Report: A Pre-K-12 Curriculum Framework, Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, and NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. The lessons are organized around the statistical problemsolving process in the GAISE guidelines: formulate a statistical question, design and implement a plan to collect data, analyze the data by measures and graphs, and interpret the data in the context of the original question. Teachers can navigate the STEW lessons by grade level and statistical topic.

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  • A pun to aid in discussing Stirling's approximation.  The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in January 2018.

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