Data Collection

  • A quote that might be used in discussing the research cycle, the scientific method, and the nature of experiments versus observational studies as well as the difference in purpose between quantitative and qualitative studies. The quote is by American author Zora Neale Hurston (1891 – 1960) and appeared in her book Dust Tracks on a Road (1942) chapter 10 p. 143. The quote may also be found at www.quotationsbywomen.com
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  • A quote that might help in a discussion of the value of observational over experimental when the Hawthorne effect is important. The quote is by American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978). The quote is found in her book Blackberry Winter (1972).
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  • A joke about the need for a comparison group. The joke was written in 2011 by Dennis Pearl from The Ohio State University and told in his after dinner talk at the 2011 USCOTS banquet.
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  • The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource is a collection of data sets. It includes definitions of each variable in the data set. It requires a login to retrieve the data sets. Registering involves giving your name and address and the name of the study and a detailed description of the intended use of the data.
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  • This software allows you to extract data from published graphs. There is a web-based app and a downloadable version. First, you provide the software with a picture of the graph in question. Then you give it two points on the x-axis and two points on the y-axis for reference. Then you click on the points on the graph that you want to extract. The points are put into a .csv file.

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  • A cartoon that can be used in discussions about sampling plans and the difficulty of implementing a plan (or in discussions of inclusion and exclusion criteria in an experiment). The "Dragon sampling" idea was due to Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The caption came from the participants at a 2015 USCOTS breakout session as part of a caption writing activity facilitated by Dennis Pearl, Larry Lesser, and John Weber. The cartoon was sketched live during the session by British cartoonist John Landers (with the color version being finished during a second session). This is the first of two captions for this cartoon. All Landers copyrighted cartoons on CAUSEweb are free for non-profit educational use.
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  • A cartoon that can be used in discussions about sampling plans, the dangers of voluntary sampling, and the importance of human subjects review in carrying out research. The "Dragon sampling" idea was due to Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The caption came from the participants at a 2015 USCOTS breakout session as part of a caption writing activity facilitated by Dennis Pearl, Larry Lesser, and John Weber. The cartoon was sketched live during a previous session by British cartoonist John Landers with the color version being finished during this second session (see Dragon Sampling I for the caption created during the first session). This is the second of two captions for this cartoon. All Landers copyrighted cartoons on CAUSEweb are free for non-profit educational use.
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  • A song to be used in discussing experimental design and the importance of control, replication, randomization, and blocking. The song was written by Laura Krajewski, an undergraduate student at University of Toronto, Mississauga and took first place in the 2015 A-mu-sing contest. May be sung to the tune of "I Love You Will Still Sound the Same" by Oh Honey.
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  • "We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning." is a quote by German Physicist Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976) that can be used in discussing the validity of measurements. The quote arose in a series of lectures delivered at University of St. Andrews, Scotland in the 1955-1956 academic year and published in Physics and Philosophy: The Revolution in Modern Science (1958).
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  • A song to be used in discussions of the problems and challenges with modern polling (e.g. the use of Robo calling contact methods and the very low response rates making weighting to avoid bias more crucial than sampling variability issues). The lyrics were written in 2016 by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University and Lawrence Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso. The song may be sung to the tune of Bob Seger's 1978 hit "Old Time Rock and Roll." Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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