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Data Collection

  • This collection of datasets from Dr. John Rasp's Statistics Webpage is for his STAT 460 (Experimental Design & Advanced Data Analysis), STAT 301 (Business Statistics), STAT 201 (Intro to Business Statistics) classes. This also provides links for statistical web pages, resources for statistical studies, Homework and lecture reviews.
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  • A cartoon to aid in the discussion of volunteer sampling and response bias in surveys. The cartoon was created in 2017 by Sabrina Cappella, a student at the University of Toronto at Mississauga and took the grand prize in the 2017 A-mu-sing competition.
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  • A cartoon to aid in the discussion of the importance of replication. The cartoon was created in 2017 by Lyla El-Fayomi, a student at the University of Toronto at Mississauga and won an honorable mention in the cartoon category of the 2017 A-mu-sing competition.
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  • Big data analysis is explained in this online course that introduces the user to the tools Hadoop and Mapreduce. These tools allow for the parallel computing necessary to analyze large amounts of data.

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  • This tutorial on SQL teaches the most used commands. There is a short explanation, then the user is asked a simple question. If the typed answer is correct, the user continues to the next lesson.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the importance of efficiency in sampling. The cartoon was used in the April 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Mickey Dunlap from University of Georgia. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. Three honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the April competition included “Better to ask for help BEFORE you're drowning in data!,” written by Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso; “I guess I should have asked for more details before signing up for this "Streaming Data" workshop,” written by Chris Lacke from Rowan University; and “On reflection, random sampling WITH replacement might not have been appropriate in this scenario,” written by Aaron Profitt from God’s Bible School and College.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the value of stratification in reducing the variability of population estimates (and the difficulty in doing so when the population weights are unknown).. The cartoon was used in the May 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Jim Alloway of EMSQ Associates. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. Two honorable mentions that rose to the top of the judging in the May competition may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-ii written by Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso and at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-iii written by John Bailer from Miami University.
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the advantages and disadvantages of random assignment when n is small and there are clear confounders (here the assignment might be to which product is tested first). The cartoon was used in the May 2017 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This caption was written by John Bailer from Miami University and took honorable mention in the contest. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The winning caption in the May competition may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-i (written by Jim Alloway of EMSQ Associates) and an honorable mention may be found at www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/product-testing-ii written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A poem to illustrate the dependence between trials when sampling is without replacement. To set this poem up in the classroom, you might ask the students questions like: "If I want to put the Supreme Court Justices in a random order, I can pick one at a time without replacement. Before I pick the first Justice, do I know who it's going to be? Before I pick the last Justice, do I know who it's going to be?" The poem was written in 2017 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A cartoon suitable for use in discussing the validity of indexes constructed to be relevant for a concept. The cartoon is number 1571 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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