Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Data Collection

  • A cartoon that can be helpful in discussing how computational advances affect the processing and analysis of big data. The cartoon was used in the November 2018 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon that can be a vehicle to discuss the nature of convenience samples and how they are likely to differ from probability-based samples. The cartoon was used in the January, 2018 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon to provide a nice avenue for facilitating discussions of planning for adequate sample sizes in experiments.The cartoon was used in the October, 2017 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was written by Greg Snow from Grigham Young University. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

    2
    Average: 2 (1 vote)
  • A cartoon to initiate a class discussion about the value of matched designs in reducing variability (the people in the cages in the cartoon being matched by color of clothes and by gender).The cartoon was used in the June, 2017 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was submitted by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about cohort effects versus age effects in epidemiological studies. The cartoon is number 2080 (December, 2018) from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to help in discussing Latin Square experimental designs. The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in November, 2018.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon to be used for in discussing human subjects issues during a unit on designing experiments. The cartoon was used in the August 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This winning caption was submitted by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. An honorable mention for a caption that also rose to the top of the judging in the August competition was "The Poisson model for rare events was about to be tested," which may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/twins-ii

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to aid in discussing Confirmation Bias (bias introduced in surveys because respondents tend to interpret things in a way that confirms their preexisting beliefs).  The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The Universisty of Texas at El Paso and Dennis Pearl from The Pennsylvania State University in October, 2018.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to help in discussing Latin Square experimental designs. The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in October, 2018.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This song covers some major real-world examples in the history of random sampling. The lyric was written in 2017 by Lawrence M Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and can be sung to the tune of theHarry Casey and Richard Finch song “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” that was a 1976 #1 hit for KC and the Sunshine Band.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages