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  • Funded by the National Science Foundation, workshops were held over a three-year period, each with about twenty participants nearly equally divided between mathematics educators and statisticians. In these exchanges the mathematics educators presented honest assessments of the status of mathematics education research (both its strengths and its weaknesses), and the statisticians provided insights into modern statistical methods that could be more widely used in such research. The discussions led to an outline of guidelines for evaluating and reporting mathematics education research, which were molded into the current report. The purpose of the reporting guidelines is to foster the development of a stronger foundation of research in mathematics education, one that will be scientific, cumulative, interconnected, and intertwined with teaching practice. The guidelines are built around a model involving five key components of a high-quality research program: generating ideas, framing those ideas in a research setting, examining the research questions in small studies, generalizing the results in larger and more refined studies, and extending the results over time and location. Any single research project may have only one or two of these components, but such projects should link to others so that a viable research program that will be interconnected and cumulative can be identified and used to effect improvements in both teaching practice and future research. The guidelines provide details that are essential for these linkages to occur. Three appendices provide background material dealing with (a) a model for research in mathematics education in light of a medical model for clinical trials; (b) technical issues of measurement, unit of randomization, experiments vs. observations, and gain scores as they relate to scientifically based research; and (c) critical areas for cooperation between statistics and mathematics education research, including qualitative vs. quantitative research, educating graduate students and keeping mathematics education faculty current in education research, statistics practices and methodologies, and building partnerships and collaboratives.
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  • This NSF funded project provides worksheets and laboratories for introductory statistics. The overview page contains links to 9 worksheets that can be done without technology, which address the topics of obtaining data, summarizing data, probability, regression and correlation, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. The page also contains twelve laboratories that require the use of technology. Data sets are provided in Minitab format.
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  • Song calls for the importance of chance, juxtaposed a variety of statistical terms. May be sung to the tune of "Give Peace a Chance" (John Lennon). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A cartoon to teach how it is important to look at variation, not just averages. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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    Average: 4.5 (2 votes)
  • A cartoon using a classic example for teaching the idea that correlation does not imply causation. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl and Deb Rumsey (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon for teaching about the interpretation of basic summary statistics. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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    Average: 4 (1 vote)
  • A cartoon for teaching about the key caveats of correlation and regression. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • When the weather predicts 30 percent chance of rain, rain is twice as likely as when 60 percent chance is predicted. A quote by American author Thomas Parry (1947 - ) found in "The Official Explanations" by Paul Dickson. The quote also appears in Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • A theory can be proved by an experiment; but no path leads from experiment to the birth of a theory. A quote attributed to Physicist Albert Einstein (1879 - 1955) in the July 18, 1976 issue of "The Sunday Times." The quote also appears in Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • If there is a 50-50 chance that something can go wrong, then 9 times out of 10 it will. A quote attributed to a 1979 broadcast of American radio commentator Paul Harvey (1918 - 2009). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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