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  • I bet on a horse at ten-to-one. It didn't come in until half-past five. is a quote by comedian and violinist Henny Youngman (1906 - 1998).
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  • This short article begins with a brief explanation of 3D barcodes (what they are and how they are used), and then provides an argument for why statistics should be studied and how statistics is a part of everyday life. Several links are shared for other resources related to teaching and learning statistics, in addition to a link to a career options in statistics.
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  • Inside every nonBayesian there is a Bayesian struggling to get out. is a quote by British Bayesian Statistician Dennis V. Lindley (1923- ). The quote is also cited on page 497 of E.T. Jaynes 2003 book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science".
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  • Avoid Linear extrapolation ... The turkey's first 1000 days are a seemingly unending succession of gradually improving circumstances confirmed by daily experience. What happens on Day 1001? Thanksgiving. The quote is by John E. Sener (1954 - ) of Sener Learning services found in the on-line article "Strategies for Effective `20/20 Vision` -- #1: Avoid Linear Extrapolation" at www.senerlearning.net/?q=node/176. The quote is paraphrasing the turkey metaphor made famous by Bertrand Russell and Nassim Nicholas Taleb.
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  • This joke can be used in a discussion of how sample size affects the reliability of the sample mean. The joke may be found amongst the extensive Science Jokes resources at www.newyorkscienceteacher.com
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  • In earlier times they had no statistics and so they had to fall back on lies. This is a quote by Canadian economist Stephen Leacock (1869 - 1944). The quote is found on page 265 of his 1938 book "In Model Memoirs and Other Sketches from Simple to Serious"
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  • This is a large collection of statistics related jokes and humor compiled by Gary C. Ramseyer. The collection is indexed by statistical topic for ease of use.
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  • Song is about formal constructions of probability theory. May be sung to the tune of "Strawberry Fields" by John Lennon and Paul McCartney. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • This activity represents a very general demonstration of the effects of the Central Limit Theorem (CLT). The activity is based on the SOCR Sampling Distribution CLT Experiment. This experiment builds upon a RVLS CLT applet (http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~lane/stat_sim/sampling_dist/) by extending the applet functionality and providing the capability of sampling from any SOCR Distribution. Goals of this activity: provide intuitive notion of sampling from any process with a well-defined distribution; motivate and facilitate learning of the central limit theorem; empirically validate that sample-averages of random observations (most processes) follow approximately normal distribution; empirically demonstrate that the sample-average is special and other sample statistics (e.g., median, variance, range, etc.) generally do not have distributions that are normal; illustrate that the expectation of the sample-average equals the population mean (and the sample-average is typically a good measure of centrality for a population/process); show that the variation of the sample average rapidly decreases as the sample size increases.
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  • This site presents several photographs from real life that demonstrate natural statistical concepts. Each picture shows a statistical distribution made by some pattern occuring in everyday life. An explanation of each picture tells what distribution is being represented and how.
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