Literature Index

Displaying 3311 - 3320 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Iversen, G. R.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    This report consists of excerpts from a paper entitled "The Religion of Statistics?" and discusses writing papers in statistics courses.
  • Author(s):
    Cerrito, P. B.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    This paper is concerned with a general education course in elementary statistics, a course which is open to students of all disciplines. This provides an interesting mix of student interests. Some of the students are very familiar with the use of technology, having personal computers in their homes which they use on a frequent basis. Other students have never touched a computer and suffer a great deal of anxiety at the mere thought of using this technology. The curriculum must be designed to appeal to both types of students.
  • Author(s):
    Maxine Pfannkuch
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    Year 11 (15-year-old) students are not exposed to formal statistical inferential methods.<br>When drawing conclusions from data, their reasoning must be based mainly on looking at graph<br>representations. Therefore, a challenge for research is to understand the nature and type of informal<br>inferential reasoning used by students. In this paper two studies are reported. The first study reports on the<br>development of a model for a teacher's reasoning when drawing informal inferences from the comparison<br>of box plots. Using this model, the second study investigates the type of reasoning her students displayed<br>in response to an assessment task. The resultant analysis produced a conjectured hierarchical model for<br>students' reasoning. The implications of the findings for instruction are discussed.
  • Author(s):
    Heaton, R. M., &amp; Mickelson, W. T.
    Year:
    2000
    Abstract:
    The purpose of this study is to examine our efforts to help preservice teachers develop statistical knowledge and experience through integrating reasoning with data into existing K-6 curriculum via a professional field-based practicum.
  • Author(s):
    Metz, K.E.
    Editors:
    Becker, J. R., &amp; Pence, B. J.
    Year:
    1993
    Abstract:
    Research literatures offer discrepant views concerning what understanding of chance entails, its relation to thinking probabilistically, and the nature of alternative interpretations. This study capitalized on the technology of videotapes to closely examine children's interpretations within tasks involving randomness and a qualitative level of differential probabilities.
  • Author(s):
    Kuzmak, S. D., &amp; Gelman, R.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    2 experiments on the development of the understanding of random phenomena are reported. Of interest was whether children understand the characteristic uncertainty in the physical nature of random phenomena as well as the unpredictability of outcomes. Children were asked, for both a random and a determined phenomenon, whether they knew what its next outcome would be and why. In Experiment 1, 4-, 5-, and 7-year-olds correctly differentiated their responses to the question of outcome predictability; the 2 older groups also mentioned appropriate characteristics of the random mechanism in explaining why they did not know what its outcome would be. Although 3-year-olds did not differentiate the random and determined phenomena, neither did they treat both phenomena as predictable. This latter result is inconsistent with Piaget and Inhelder's characterization of an early stage of development. Experiment 2 was designed to control for the possibility that children in Experiment 1 learned how to respond on the basis of pretest experience with the 2 different phenomena. 5- and 7-year-olds performed at a comparable level to the same-aged children in Experiment 1. Results suggest an earlier understanding of random phenomena than previously has been reported and support results on the literature indicating an early understanding of causality.
  • Author(s):
    Whiting, D. G., &amp; Scott, D. T.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., &amp; Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    Using exclusively open-source software, we have developed and implemented an online testing system dubbed YStatTest. This system allows instructors to create homework, quizzes, and exams by querying a database containing question templates. A template is selected based on such elements as keywords, categories, and historical difficulty. Numerical values, data, and correct answers for each question template are randomly generated upon exam creation. Thus, although two students may receive identical templates, they will likely differ in placement on the exam and most assuredly in the data and numerical values associated with the question. We discuss the impact this testing system has had upon student learning and highlight future planned development for our software.
  • Author(s):
    Amanda Williams
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    The purpose of the current research was to investigate the relationship between preference for numerical information (PNI), math self-concept, and six types of statistics anxiety in an attempt to establish support for the nomological validity of the PNI. Correlations indicate that four types of statistics anxiety were strongly related to PNI, and two were not related. Math self-concept was also strongly related to PNI. Results suggest that higher PNI is associated with higher math self-concept and lower statistics anxiety in graduate students, and indicate support for the nomological validity of the PNI within the context of graduate statistics classes.
  • Author(s):
    Fitzallen, Noleine Elizabeth
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    Exploration of the way in which students interacted with the software package, TinkerPlots Dynamic Data Exploration, to answer questions about a data set using different forms of graphical representations, revealed that the students used three dominant strategies – Snatch and Grab, Proceed and Falter, and Explore and Complete. The participants in the study were 12 year 5-and-6 students (11-12 years old) who completed data analysis activities and answered questions about the data analysis process undertaken. The data for the inquiry were collected by on-screen capture video as the students worked at the computer with TinkerPlots. Thematic analysis was used to explore the data to determine the students’ strategies when conducting data analysis within the software environment.
  • Author(s):
    Erickson, Tim
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    Ordinarily, when a student plays a game on a computer, a great deal of data are generated, but never used. This paper describes a technological innovation: games designed for learning mathematics or statistics concepts in which success requires data analysis. These “Data Games” are small-scale, short, web-based games, embedded in a data analysis environment, suitable for students in about year 7 onwards, and in teacher preparation. We discuss design for the games themselves, curriculum and assessment issues, and connections to research.

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