Literature Index

Displaying 3241 - 3250 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Jonathan R. Bradley, David L. Farnsworth
    Year:
    2009
    Abstract:
    The surprising property of many data sets that their first significant digits follow Benford's Law provides examples that can pique and hold students' interest. Several ideas for student activities are presented.
  • Author(s):
    Ben-Zvi, D., Gil, E., & Apel, N.
    Editors:
    D. Pratt & J. Ainley
    Year:
    2007
  • Author(s):
    Louis Guttman
    Year:
    1988
  • Author(s):
    Joliffe, F.
    Editors:
    Pereira-Mendoza, L., Seu Kea, L., Wee Kee, T. and Wong, W. K.
    Year:
    1998
    Abstract:
    The history and current nature of research in statistics education are outlined and some<br>suggestions for its future direction are made. It is claimed that research in statistics<br>education is a research discipline in its own right.
  • Author(s):
    Lane-Getaz, S. J.
    Editors:
    Burrill, G. F.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    This article describes a learning environment used in a college preparatory high school class which incorporated investigative lab activities.
  • Author(s):
    Marcin Kozak
    Year:
    2009
    Abstract:
    Interpretation of correlation is often based on rules of thumb in which some boundary values are given to help decide whether correlation is non-important, weak, strong or very strong. This article shows that such rules of thumb may do more harm than good, and instead of supporting interpretation of correlation - which is their aim - they teach a schematic approach to statistics. Therefore they should be avoided in a statistics course.
  • Author(s):
    Batanero, C., &amp; Sanchez, E.
    Editors:
    Jones, G. A.
    Year:
    2005
    Abstract:
    This is a review of the research that focuses specifically on the probabilistic thinking of secondary school students (14 - 18 years) and the relation to curriculum expectations. In particular, we will look at research associated with some key elements for the probability curriculum: combinatorial reasoning and problem solving, randomness, probability misconceptions, conditional variables and probability distributions, sampling and inference, and simulation. We will also consider the implication of this research for teaching probability in the secondary school.
  • Author(s):
    Richardson, M., &amp; Haller, S.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    This paper begins by describing two hands-on activities developed for teaching basic statistical concepts to junior high students. Through generating, collecting, displaying, and analyzing data, students are given the opportunity to explore a variety of descriptive statistical techniques and develop an understanding of the distinction between theoretical, subjective, and empirical (or experimental) probabilities. These activities are then extended to introduce the sampling distribution of a sample proportion. The extension is appropriate for use in grades 9 through 12, in an Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics course, or in an introductory statistics course at the undergraduate level.
  • Author(s):
    Shaun S. Wulff and Timothy J. Robinson
    Year:
    2014
    Abstract:
    Bayesian methodology continues to be widely used in statistical applications. As a result, it is increasingly important to introduce students to Bayesian thinking at early stages in their mathematics and statistics education. While many students in upper level probability courses can recite the differences in the Frequentist and Bayesian inferential paradigms, these students often struggle using Bayesian methods when conducting data analysis. Specifically, students tend to struggle translating subjective belief to the specification of a prior distribution and the incorporation of uncertainty in the Bayesian inferential approach. The purpose of this paper is to present a hands-on activity involving the Beta-Binomial model to facilitate an intuitive understanding of the Bayesian approach through subjective problem formulation which lies at the heart of Bayesian statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Mackisack, M.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    This paper describes a situation where systematic use is being made of data collected by students as part of a class project and advocates the wider use of such projects. The immediate learning benefits to the students involved in carrying out projects have been widely canvassed recently, and this paper reports some experiences with a particular type of project. Advantage is also taken of these projects as a source of material for problem-based learning in applied statistics at all levels, and some specific reasons for the potential importance of such material are advanced.

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