Literature Index

Displaying 3201 - 3210 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Schmid, Kendra K
    Year:
    2013
    Abstract:
    One of the challenges of teaching is engaging students in a subject they may not see as relevant to them. This issue is especially prevalent when teaching statistics to health science students as many do not consider statistics an important piece of their medical training. Additional difficulty is presented when teaching courses via distance technology or courses that are partially or completely online as the valuable class discussion component is lost. This paper focuses on fostering “discussion” about statistical concepts and how they relate to each student on an individual level. This paper describes the online discussion board as a tool incorporated to supplement classroom activities and not as one to be limited to the online class. Two activities where the discussion board can be utilized are described: one where students participate in a series of guided discussions through instructor provided, thought-provoking questions and another where students critique an article related to their field of study and post for discussion. The objectives are to enhance knowledge, develop critical thinking, gain an appreciation of how statistics is used in different fields, and provide opportunities for discussion outside the classroom. Students are able to discuss issues with classmates who can be in the classroom or abroad using a virtual environment. This approach has been successfully used in both purely online classes and in large graduate level biostatistics classes including both synchronous and asynchronous distance learners.
  • Author(s):
    Chris Wild
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    Darius et al. (2007) and Nolan & Temple Lang (2007) give examples of virtual environments that can, for specific purposes, substitute for the real world. We are in the early stages of developments that could revolutionize statistics education by making it possible to capture efficiently important aspects of the thinking and practice of professional statisticians previously learned only from long years of experience. The ability of virtual environments to automate processes provides a potent weapon for tackling the tyranny that Time exercises over such modes of learning. We discuss the many new possibilities that are opened up by virtual environments together with cognitive and pedagogical imperatives to be addressed to ensure that environments actually do teach the lessons they were designed to teach. We echo Nolan and Temple Lang's call for the development of environments to be modular and open source. Taking the R-project as a model, this can lead to a growing repository of building blocks that make the construction of future environments less costly, thus facilitating the realization of more and more ambitious conceptions.
  • Author(s):
    Paul L. Darius, Kenneth M. Portier and Eddie Schrevens
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    The ability to design experiments in an appropriate and efficient way is an important skill, but students typically have little opportunity to get that experience. Most textbooks introduce standard general-purpose designs, and then proceed with the analysis of data already collected. In this paper we explore a tool for gaining design experience: computer-based virtual experiments. These are software environments which mimic a real situation of interest and invite the user to collect data to answer a research question. Two prototype environments are described. The first one is suitable for a course that deals with screening or response surface designs, the second one allows experimenting with block and row-column designs. They are parts of a collection we developed called ENV2EXP, and can be freely used over the web. We also describe our experience in using them in several courses over the last few years.
  • Author(s):
    James Baglin, John Reece, and Jenalle Baker
    Year:
    2015
    Abstract:
    Many recent improvements in pedagogical practice have been enabled by the rapid development of innovative technologies, particularly for teaching quantitative research methods and statistics. This study describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a series of specialised computer laboratory sessions. The sessions combined the use of an online virtual world, cloud collaboration technology, and a statistical package in order to simulate the entire data investigative cycle. The sessions covered multiple topics, research designs, and data analysis techniques relevant to psychology. Quantitative and qualitative feedback data regarding students’ perceptions of the sessions were analysed. The results demonstrate promising support for the use of Island-based sessions, but improvements and further research will be required.
  • Author(s):
    Shaltayev, Dmitriy S., Hodges, Harland, Hasbrouck, Robert B.
    Year:
    2010
    Abstract:
    In this empirical study we compare student performance using two different teaching methods in introductory business statistics course. Two groups were taught in the computer lab with software available at students' fingertips while one was taught in the regular classroom with only a computer workstation for the instructor. VISA (Visual Interactive Statistical Analysis), an Excel-based analysis software package was used in classroom to perform computational analysis of the data in all three groups. Exam data and final course grades indicate that student performance between the two methods was not affected by presence of the software in classroom for use by students. This leads us to conclude that VISA is an intuitive enough tool, which does not require a major learning curve, and can be mastered by students with minimal supervision. Second, we conclude that if the software used for statistics instruction is "teaching-friendly", then technology availability in the classroom does not affect learning efficiency. This allows instructors to concentrate more efforts in class teaching conceptually important material.
  • Author(s):
    Palacios-Gonzalez, F.
    Editors:
    Phillips, B.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    The aim of this paper is to show how teachers can use Visual Basic language on the spreadsheet for student sin order to gain the skills need in using nonparametric techniques for density and regression function estimations. The author has built a useful didactic tool on Excel Visual Basic for teaching and practice of nonparametric kernel methods, being intended for students with some preliminary knowledge on this topic. This Visual Basic Application (VBA) is loaded into Excel as a MACRO (or into the modules of a Workbook for EXCEL). The specific user functions incorporated into it are easy tools for students to obtain an intuitive perception of nonparametric estimation for density and regression functions. The VBA also allows Excel to make use of an added menu similar to a small Statistical Package specialised in nonparametric methods.
  • Author(s):
    Zimmermann, W., & Cunningham, S.
    Editors:
    Zimmermann, W., & Cunningham, S.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    This volume explores the role of visualization in mathematics education, especially undergraduate education.
  • Author(s):
    Harper, W. V., & Clark, I.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    Geostatistics is sometimes a difficult leap for even those individuals well versed in classical statistics. The impact of data location in spatial statistics may be only vaguely understood initially. Visualization tools that allow the student or practitioner to see the impact of moving data, adding additional data, deleting data, adding fault lines, changing search radiuses, and so forth aid the learning of geostatistical concepts. Due to page limitations only a few items are briefly illustrated. This visualization software called the Kriging Game is available free at http://geoecosse.bizland.com/softwares/ . This site also has other free geostatistical software and tutorials.
  • Author(s):
    Hammerman, J., Rubin, A.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    The Visualizing Statistical Relationships (ViSoR) project at TERC is studying how people learn about data analysis and statistics and how computer visualization tools can enhance that learning.
  • Author(s):
    Doane, D. P., Mathieson, K., & Tracy, R. L.
    Abstract:
    Three software modules were created to help students learn to visualize hypothesis tests, based either on scenarios or on a Do-It-Yourself control panel to set up the experiment. The one-sample and two-sample modules illustrate tests of means or variances. For each sample, there is a dot plot with optional overlays of the populations or sampling distributions, table of statistics and parameters, confidence intervals, and theoretical distribution of the test statistic with the rejection region shaded. The ANOVA module offers stacked dot plots, ANOVA table, and sample statistics. Each module allows replication experiments to estimate empirical Type I or II error. There is an extensive help system. Software has been tested on students. The modules are part of an NSF-supported project to enhance quantitative reasoning and motivate students.

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