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Literature Index

Displaying 3171 - 3180 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Sterling Hilton
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    Beginning in January 2005, the ASA (with support from the National Science Foundation) started a series of three workshops for statisticians and mathematics education researchers. The purpose of these workshops was to make recommendations on ways to promote high-quality education research that can stand up under the scrutiny of other scientific communities and that will allow work to be compared and combined across research programs. A draft version of the final report from these workshops entitled "Using Statistics Effectively in Mathematics Education Research" has been written. This webinar will summarize the major points of this report and discuss their relevance to researchers in statistics education.
  • Author(s):
    Chris du Feu
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    Statistical charts can be used with very young children in order for them to understand and communicate effectively in other subject areas. This practical activity was aimed at understanding more about forces.
  • Author(s):
    Garfield, J., delMas, B., & Chance, B.
    Editors:
    Lovett, M. C., & Shah, P.
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    This paper describes some preliminary results from a classroom teaching experiment at the college level, in which students were guided through activities to reveal and develop their notions of variability. Starting with their intuitions about variability, students were asked to speculate about the distributions of different variables, focusing on the informal ideas of whether they expected the variables to have larger or smaller variability. The class activities then guided students from their intuitions about variability as meaning "lots of different values" and overall range, to a dual understanding of variability as both range and clustering in the middle. A final goal of the teaching experiment was to help students make the transition from their initial ideas of variability to the ideas that variability has many dimensions, that formal measures (e.g., range, interquartile range, and standard deviation) all measure different aspects of variability, and that these measures are more useful or appropriate (e.g., to use in comparing groups) depending on the characteristics of the data. The use of assessment items to evaluate student learning will also be described.
  • Author(s):
    Jones, G. A., Thornton, C. A., Langrall, C. W., & Mogill, A. T.
    Year:
    1997
    Abstract:
    This study addresses the development and evaluation of an instuctional program guided by research-based knowledge of students' probabilistic thinking. In particular, it seeks to (a) use a framework that describes and predicts students' thinking in probability to construct a third-grade instructional program, and (b) evaluate the effect of two different sequences of the instructional program on students' thinking in probability.
  • Author(s):
    Truran, J.
    Year:
    1998
    Abstract:
    Comments on statistical articles in the popular press by first-year economics students studying statistics in Australia and South=East Asia are analyzed. Three common weakness are described - lack of appreciation of journalistic style, disregarding statistical variation, and incorrect percentage statements. Differences between the groups are described and implications for teaching such courses are discussed.
  • Author(s):
    Miller, J. B.
    Year:
    2000
    Abstract:
    In this talk I will address how the participants in my dissertation research employed technology as a way for students to interact with statistics and focus on how this interaction with statistics through technology allows students to construct their own knowledge and understanding of statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Bakker, A., Derry, J., & Konold, C.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    We conducted two design experiments aimed at engaging sixth graders (11 years old) in statistical reasoning about center and variation. We examine in particular students' informal notion of a "modal clump." Using Peirce's concept of diagrammatic reasoning, we analyze the interplay of 1) making plots with TinkerPlots - a computer data analysis tool, 2) experimenting with those plots, and 3) developing a language to talk about features of the data sets as represented in the plots by reflecting on judgments. More generally, we draw on Brandom's recent work in philosophy to argue that an "inferential" view should be privileged over a "referential" view of teaching and learning statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Bob delMas & Ann Ooms
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    Please join us for a tour of the Assessment Resource Tools for Improving Statistical Thinking (ARTIST) web site. During this webinar, ARTIST team members Bob delMas and Ann Ooms will guide you through the ARTIST website. The tour will include an overview of an online collection of literature on assessment in statistics education, much of which can be accessed online or downloaded. Resources for creating alternative forms of assessment such as student projects will also be presented. You will also learn about efficient ways to create assessments from items from the ARTIST Item Database using a tool known as the Assessment Builder. By the end of the session, you will have learned how to select assessment items and download them in a format that can be edited with a word processor.
  • Author(s):
    Michelle Hood, Peter A. Creed, and David L. Neumann
    Year:
    2012
    Abstract:
    We examined the attitudes of about 2200 students enrolled in 101 sections of post-secondary introductory statistics service courses located across the United States. Using the Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics-36, we assessed students’ attitudes when they entered and left their courses, as well as changes in attitudes across their courses. Results showed that, on average, students entered these courses with neutral (Affect, Difficulty), positive (Cognitive Competence, Value, Interest), and very positive (Effort) attitudes. Their attitudes either stayed about the same (Affect, Cognitive Competence, Difficulty) or decreased (Value, Interest, Effort). These results help us understand the current impact of introductory statistics instruction in U.S. institutions.
  • Author(s):
    Goodman, T.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    How the microcomputer can be used to reinforce basic statistical concepts and techniques is presented. The methods for achieving this include specific statistical problems, projects, games, and simulations for use with microcomputers. (MNS)

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