Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Literature Index

Displaying 3181 - 3190 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    delMas, R. C., & Garfield, J. B.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    Our purpose was to introduce and explore a dynamic and interactive way of teaching a complex concept in statistics. Our research has used small sample sizes and single class presentations. The findings are far from definitive and conclusive. Future research needs to contrast the use of Power Simulator with instruction where the software is not used. This would be informative for comparison of both classroom presentations and out-of-class assignments. As for now, the results suggest that Power Simulator povides an effective way to introduce students to the complex concept of statistical power analysis. We are encouraged by the results to continue development of the program and find new ways to incorporate the methodology into statistics instruction.
  • Author(s):
    Apel, N., Gil, E., & Ben-Zvi, D.
    Editors:
    Y. Eshet-Alkalai, A. Caspi & N. Geri
    Year:
    2008
  • Author(s):
    Ben-Zvi, D.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    This paper focuses on developing students' informal ideas of inference and argumentation. This topic is of current interest to many researchers as well as teachers of statistics. We study fifth graders' learning processes in an exploratory interdisciplinary learning environment that uses the software TinkerPlots to scaffold students' statistical reasoning. The careful design of the learning trajectory based on increasing samples heuristics coupled with the unique features of TinkerPlots were found instrumental in supporting multiple dimensions of students reasoning about informal inference: multiplicative reasoning, aggregate reasoning, acknowledging the value of large samples, and accounting for variability. These were accompanied by greater ability to verbalize, explain and argue about data-based claims. In the light of the analysis, a description of what it may mean to begin reasoning about inference by young students is proposed, and implications to teaching, curriculum and research are drawn.
  • Author(s):
    Darius, P., Schrevens, E., van der Knaap, H., Portier, K., Massonnet, G., Livens, L., Duchateau, L., & Thas, O.
    Abstract:
    This paper describes a number of generally accessible web-based tools the authors<br>developed over the last couple of years and used in several statistics courses, ranging<br>from the introductory statistics course to a specialized design of experiments course. The first set of tools (VESTAC) illustrates statistical concepts, the second one (VIRTEX)<br>consists of virtual experiments. We discuss some of our experiences with regard to the<br>development and maintenance of these tools and their use in ex cathedra teaching<br>sessions, in guided practice sessions and in student projects. Finally we discuss a third<br>type of tools: distance experiments.
  • Author(s):
    Dani Ben-Zvi
    Editors:
    Robert Gould
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    This article attempts to make a strong case for the use of Wiki to support collaborative learning experiences for students in the statistics classroom. Wiki is an innovative Website that allows all users to add and edit content with relative simplicity. Wiki features empowered learners and bottom-up organization that enable easy authoring of Web content, open access and unrestricted collaboration. We first introduce statistics as a collaborative discipline and therefore compatible with Wiki as a collaborative learning space. We then show evidence that collaboration can improve the learning of individuals in the statistics classroom as well as the whole class. Finally we demonstrate how Wiki can facilitate collaborative learning and bring about instructional change to improve student learning of statistics. We present several types of Wiki-based activities: collaborative writing, glossaries, discussion and review, statistical projects, self-reflective journals, and assessment.
  • Author(s):
    Hayden, R. W.
    Year:
    1992
    Abstract:
    I will contrast the way statistics has often been taught in the past with what is proposed for the future.
    Location:
  • Author(s):
    Taylor, D., &amp; Skipworth, G. E.
    Editors:
    Grey, D. R., Holmes, P., Barnett, V., &amp; Constable, G. M.
    Year:
    1983
    Abstract:
    The teaching of statistics to non-statisticians is a well established practice. Indeed such is the success with which the argument for the relevancy of statistics has been put that the practice has been extended to include undergraduate and postgraduate courses not just for engineers, nor only geographers and sociologists, but even such inveterately literary characters as historians! While the latter might be considered an extreme case, there is a common problem to be found in all courses of this nature. Put simply, it consists of convincing students of the relevance and utility of statistics to their particular discipline which in turn requires the conversion of plausible theory into credible practice, the plethora of validating bodies to be found in certain sectors of higher education, but too little time has been given to the more mundane, but no less important, task of actually teaching a course in a manner that successfully converts theory into practice. This paper describes the collaboration between a statistician and historian in teaching introductory statistics to history students.
  • Author(s):
    Mavrotheris, S., Meletiou-Mavrotheris, M.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    The paper provides an overview of a new program recently funded by the European Union that aims to enhance the teaching and learning of early statistical reasoning in European schools by utilizing distance education to offer high-quality professional development experiences to geographically-dispersed teachers across Europe. Acknowledging the fact that teachers are at the heart of any educational reform, the project will facilitate intercultural collaboration of European teachers using contemporary technological and educational tools and exemplary web-based materials and resources. Long-term sustainability will be assured through support of multilingual interfaces and online servies for the accumulation of collective knowledge from teachers and teacher educators. An online knowledge base will offer access to usable and validated pedagogical models, didactic approaches, and innovative instructional materials, resulting in a complete and flexible teacher professional professional development program.
  • Author(s):
    Davit Khachatryan & Nathaniel Karst
    Year:
    2017
    Abstract:
    With the ease and automation of data collection and plummeting storage costs, organizations are faced with massive amounts of data that present two pressing challenges: technical analysis of the data themselves and communication of the analytics process and its products. Although a plethora of academic and practitioner literature have focused on the former call, the latter challenge has received less attention. Here, we present strategies that we have found effective for bolstering communication skills of both undergraduate students and masters candidates at a business school. These approaches are based on the case studies that provide ample opportunity for oral communication among students with strong backgrounds in mathematics and introductory statistics, and solid training in written communication among student populations with less homogeneous preparation. We provide detailed discussions motivated by concrete examples executed across three courses.  
  • Author(s):
    Roberts, D. M., &amp; Saxe, J. E.
    Year:
    1982
    Abstract:
    The validity of the Statistics Attitude Survey (SAS) was further examined in the present study. Students were assessed on a number of pretest and posttest cognitive and non-cognitive variables, including the SAS. SAS scores were found to be significantly related to such cognitive variables as basic mathematics skills, statistics preknowledge, and course grades. Non-cognitive factors with which SAS was significantly correlated were sex, the degree to which students indicated that they had wanted to take the course and that they were glad they had taken the course, number of previous mathematics courses completed, the status of a course being required or elective, calculator attitudes, and course and instructor evaluations. In addition, SAS scores showed a significant positive change from the beginning to the end of the course.

Pages