Literature Index

Displaying 3291 - 3300 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Thompson, P. W., Saldanha, L. A., Lui, Y.
    Year:
    2004
    Abstract:
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the development of students' thinking in relation to their engagement in classroom instruction designed to support their conceiving sampling and inference as a part of a scheme of interrelated ideas including repeated random sampling, variability among sampling outcomes, distribution, and representativeness.
  • Author(s):
    Winter, H.
    Editors:
    Grey, D. R., Holmes, P., Barnett, V., & Constable, G. M.
    Year:
    1983
    Abstract:
    In this paper I intend to propose some arguments in favour of Descriptive Statistics (DS) in the school curriculum. I think every pupil has to learn some elementary procedures, skills and concepts concerning gathering, representation, summarization, characterizing, analyzing and interpretation of data. The main aim of this paper is to convince teachers in Secondary Schools both of the importance and teachability of DS; therefore, I will give some practical suggestions too. Let me present my paper in the form of 5 theses; the first 4 may be called descriptive and the 5th prescriptive.
  • Author(s):
    Pereira-Mendoza, L., & Swift, J.
    Editors:
    Shulte, A. P., & Smart, J. R.
    Year:
    1981
    Abstract:
    This is an introduction to the book on how to teach statistics to high school students. The authors suggest using your own data collection in weather charts and business stories. Another suggestion is to have students find erroneous uses of statistics and statistical reasoning in newspaper articles and to bring them into class for analysis.
  • Author(s):
    Bock, D., & Velleman, P. F.
    Editors:
    Burrill, G. F.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    We present examples in which the addition of variances is key to gaining insight when dealing with binomial probabilities, inference and the central limit theorem.
  • Author(s):
    Mosteller, F., Nave, B., & Miech, E. J.
    Year:
    2004
    Abstract:
    The structured abstract is a viable and useful innovation to help practitioners and policymakers systematically access, assess, and communicate education studies and research findings. Relative to current practice, the structured abstract provides a more robust vehicle for disseminating research through traditional routes as well as through new channels made possible by emerging technologies.
  • Author(s):
    Meyer,
    Editors:
    Johnson, R. W.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    From a very young age, shoes for boys tend to be wider than shoes for girls. Is this because boys have wider feet, or because it is assumed that girls are willing to sacrifice comfort for fashion, even in elementary school? To assess the former, a statistician measures kids? feet.
  • Author(s):
    Gal, I.
    Year:
    1995
    Abstract:
    One key goal of adult literacy education is to empower students and enable them to become more informed citizens. This numeracy column focuses on a critical but often neglected aspect of what becoming an informed citizen entails. That aspect involves developing students' statistical literacy skills.
  • Author(s):
    Nicholson, J., Mulhern, G., & Hunt, N.
    Editors:
    Phillips, B.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    The availability of technology opens up opportunities for students to explore larger datasets and to gain experience of the effects of random variation. We have been involved in a development project to produce materials, with a sound pedagogical basis, to support the construction of accurate conceptual understanding of key statistical concepts. This paper presents the range of materials from the project and outline the pedagogical basis for them in light of the question posed in the title.
  • Author(s):
    Wells, E.
    Editors:
    Vere-Jones, D., Carlyle, S., & Dawkins, B. P.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    Women biostatisticians in New Zealand are a substantial proportion of a very small group of statisticians. The term "biostatisticians" refers to statisticians who work on research projects in the area of medical or health research. They are usually attached to schools of medicine where they provide consultancy services and teaching, although some are employed to work on large projects or within research units.
  • Author(s):
    Stinnett, S.
    Year:
    1990
    Abstract:
    Several activities at the 1989 Joint Statistical Meetings highlighted the contributions of women to the field of statistics. These activities are summarized, and selected profiles of women statisticans that were part of a display on women are featured.

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