Literature Index

Displaying 151 - 160 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Fernandez, C, Chokshi, S.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    The authors describe a process for creating deep and grounded reflection about the complex activities of teaching that can then be shared and discussed with other members of the profession.
  • Author(s):
    Cleary, R. J.
    Abstract:
    We present a grading paradigm for student projects that statistics instructors may find useful in assessing written work in a timely manner. This grading system may also help the students and instructor feel more satisfied that papers were graded objectively. The paper also discusses particular conceptual errors that the author has discovered when grading projects. We include several other class-tested suggestions for ways in which projects can be used to reinforce statistical concepts.
  • Author(s):
    Tim Erickson
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    We often look for a best-fit function to a set of data. This article describes how a "pretty good" fit might be better than a "best" fit when it comes to promoting conceptual understanding of functions. In a pretty good fit, students design the function themselves rather than choosing it from a menu; they use appropriate variable names; and they vary parameter values by hand - sometimes with the aid of residuals and other tools - to help their function fit the data.
  • Author(s):
    Borovcnik, M., Bentz, H. J., & Kapadia, R.
    Editors:
    Kapadia, R., & Borovcnik, M.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    There are unusual features in the conceptual development of probability in comparison to other mathematical theories such as geometry or arithmetic. A mathematical approach only began to emerge rather late, about three centuries ago, long after man's first experiences of chance occurrences. A large number of paradoxes accompanied the emergence of concepts indicating the disparity between intuitions and formal approaches within the sometimes difficult conceptual development. A particular problem had been to abandon the endeavour to formalize one specific interpretation and concentrate on studying the structure of probability. Eventually, a sound mathematical foundation was only published in 1933 but this has not clarified the nature of probability. There are still a number of quite distinctive philosophical approaches which arouse controversy to this day. In this part of the book all these aspects are discussed in order to present a mathematical or probabilistic perspective. The scene is set by presenting the philosophical background in conjunction with historical development; the mathematical framework offers a current viewpoint while the paradoxes illuminate the probabilistic ideas.
  • Author(s):
    Gelman, A. & Nolan, D.
    Editors:
    Goodall, G.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    We derive a model, using trigonometry and the Normal distribution, for the probability that a golf putt is successful. We describe a class activity in which we lead the students through the steps of examining the data, considering possible models, constructing a probability model and checking the fit. The model is,of necessity, oversimplified, a point which the class discusses at the end of the demonstration.
  • Author(s):
    Boyle, C.
    Year:
    1999
    Abstract:
    Courses taught using problem-based learning methods give life sciences graduate students direct practice in the statistical reasoning skills needed to choose appropriate procedures for analyzing data from their research studies. This paper describes a graduate-level, case-based biostatistics course designed to cultivate these skills in veterinary medical science students who have had some initial preparation in statistics. The course gives students practical experience by focusing on the analysis of data from actual biomedical research studies. Student evaluations indicated that this course improved the students' ability to understand and apply statistical methods in their research.
  • Author(s):
    Mathieson, K., Doane, D. P., & Tracy, R. L.
    Year:
    1995
    Abstract:
    This paper describes one program in the Teaching Statistics Visually (TSV) project. TSV supports inductive learning in introductory undergraduate applied statistics courses. The program (1) helps teach concepts rather than analyze data, (2) focuses on one module in a statistics course, (3) relies on visualization rather than formulas, (4) is easy to use, (5) is flexible, supporting different learning levels, and (6) is easy to manage, requiring commonly available resources and incorporating special features to simplify classroom use. A prototype version of the program "Comparing Two Normal Distributions" is included with this paper. The reader is invited to experiment with the program and to send comments and suggestions for improvement to the authors.
  • Author(s):
    Mausner, B., et al.
    Year:
    1983
    Abstract:
    Discussed is the design, development, and evaluation of a self-paced college program in statistics which used computer assisted instruction. The program permitted a great deal of individual attention to weak students and freed the strong student to whip through the acquisition of the tools necessary to plan and conduct research. (RM)
  • Author(s):
    Arribas, C.
    Editors:
    Phillips, B.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    At the National Statistical Institute (NSI) a Programme of Technical Cooperation with Spanish-speaking countries of America was started up some twenty years ago (1978). The aim of the programme was to exchange experiences and offer further training to professionals working at National Statistical Offices, Central Banks, Ministries of Planning and Customs, and the main institutions producing the official statistics of the countries in the Region. The training activities consist of courses, seminars and workshops, which are held both in Spain and other countries. These are also supplemented with "étages" in Spain and the sending of "experts" to the countries requiring advice on new projects. The training activities are predominantly practical, although they also have a theoretical module of statistical methodology and a conceptual framework of the different projects. The purpose of this Programme is to train personnel in the production of official statistics, pass on the new technologies from Spain and the European Union, and supply them with the material and documentation used to carry out the different projects.
  • Author(s):
    Scozzafava, R.
    Editors:
    Vere-Jones, D., Carlyle, S., & Dawkins, B. P.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    We report on a project of combined teaching of probability and statistics in the Italian secondary schools. The aim is to bring a group of secondary school teachers up-to-date, without getting involved with complicated arguments and trying to overcome the barriers created by prevailing opinions (such as the combinatorial or frequentist approaches) concerning the teaching of probability and statistics. The project involves the study of specific teaching patterns, which aim at inculcating the idea of inductive reasoning as complementary to deductive reasoning, and no providing a kit of statistical tools for use in practice. In fact, teaching based on subjective probability and Bayesian statistics allows the coverage in a short time of some of the most significant aspects of statistical thinking. This can be done through an inferential model based on the iterative use of Bayes' theorem: hundreds of experiments can be simulated on a computer using elementary software. New statistical data can be used to evaluate current (posterior) probability; then taking this as the starting point (prior probability), further experiments produce another posterior probability, and so on.

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