Literature Index

Displaying 161 - 170 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Love, T. E.
    Year:
    1998
    Abstract:
    I trace the development of a new course in modern data analysis involving a wide spectrum of statistical techniques. Because the course is based entirely on case studies, real-data settings, and student projects and is computer-intensive, a series of challenges facing many instructors are addressed. In a single semester, students explore data using tools from EDA, multiple regression, analysis of variance, time series analysis, and categorical data analysis. The focus is on understanding and forecasting in a variety of data settings, learning how to summarize relationships and measure how well these relationships fit data, and how to make meaningful statistical inferences when the usual assumptions do not hold. The course emphasizes what the statistical process is all about: how to conduct studies, what the results mean, and what can be inferred about the whole from pieces of evidence.
  • Author(s):
    Rocha Salamanca, P. G.
    Editors:
    Rossman, A., & Chance, B.
    Year:
    2006
    Abstract:
    In this report we present a proposal to work in the classroom starting from some theoretical and conceptual elements that might be used for teachers when facing the problem of teaching the main probability and statistics concepts in the Colombian context. We first reflect on the knowledge that is offered in the country and then outline a didactic work approach from exploratory data analysis.
  • Author(s):
    Ishiguro, M.
    Editors:
    Vere-Jones, D., Carlyle, S., & Dawkins, B. P.
    Year:
    1991
    Abstract:
    We shall discuss the software and hardware which are required to develop new models from data analysis.
  • Author(s):
    Cross, K. P.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    Perspectives on the improvement of college instruction are offered. External forces that focus attention on the quality of college instruction are identified, including: the demand for good teaching by two groups of nontraditional students (low-performing students and adult students); technology, and especially new interactive technologies; the growing interest in assessment and program evaluation; the new emphasis on alterable variables in educational research; the lack of mobility for faculty members; and low morale among the teaching faculty. While the classroom lecture method is the method of choice for college teachers, one promising method for better learning of subject-matter content has been the Personalized System of Instruction, which emphasizes student involvement, high expectations, and assessment and feedback. Problems arise when colleges that are primarily teaching institutions turn to faculty publication as their route to distinction. For undergraduate education to improve, teachers will need support of their colleges, including the commitment to evaluate teaching performance in decisions to hire, promote, and tenure faculty members. It is recommended that research on teaching and learning should be done in classrooms across the nation by classroom teachers ("classroom researchers.")
  • Author(s):
    Wardrop, R. L.
    Year:
    1992
    Abstract:
    This paper describes a new approach to a one semester introductory statistics course. This approach has been used by three instructors, including the author, at Madison. My primary goal is to enable students to discover that statistics can be an important tool in daily life. This is achieved by showing students that they are scientists, in a broad sense, and that statistics is an essential tool for doing science. The focus through the course is on scientific questions and how statistical thinking can shed light on their solutions. In short, data are preeminent and methods achieve importance through their ability to illuminate data sets. This is the reversal of the common practice of methods being the focal point and data sets being reduced to illustrating methods. This paper also describes the author's successes with early (in the semester) use of student projects.
  • Author(s):
    McGowan, Herle M, Gunderson, Brenda K
    Year:
    2010
    Abstract:
    This paper describes a randomized experiment conducted in an undergraduate introductory statistics course that investigated the impact of clickers on students. Specifically, the effects of three features of clicker use on engagement and learning were explored. These features included: 1) the number of questions asked during a class period, 2) the way those questions were incorporated into the material, and 3) the grading or monitoring of clicker use. Several hierarchical linear models of both engagement and learning outcomes were fit. Based on these analyses, there was little evidence that clicker use increased students' engagement. There was some evidence, however, that clicker use improved students' learning. Increases in learning seemed to take place when the clicker questions were well incorporated into the material, particularly if the number of questions asked was low.
  • Author(s):
    Gravemeijer, K.
    Year:
    2000
    Abstract:
    We present an instructional sequence on analyzing one- and two-dimensional data sets. This instructional sequence is based on teaching experiments in a 7th-, and 8th-grade classroom in Nashville, TN. The sequence we present here, however is not just a smooth version of the sequence that we have tried out. What we learned during these teaching experiments made us reconsider a lot of the original instructional activities. The aim of this paper is not to present the result of these considerations as a ready-made instructional sequence. Instread, out min objective is to offer a rationale for a revised instructional sequence. This rationale is construed from the following ingredients: original considerations that formed the point of departure for our teaching experiment, experiences in the classroom, re-considerations, and new insights.
  • Author(s):
    Goldin, G. A.
    Year:
    1990
    Abstract:
    This document explores some reasons why statistics and probability are appropriate topics for primary and secondary schools.
  • Author(s):
    Kahneman, D., & Tversky, A.
    Year:
    1982
    Abstract:
    The authors state the view that many intuitive judgements, right and wrong, are produced by the application of heuristics such as the representativeness and availability. Moreover, observed errors of judgement have two kinds of implications: they may illustrate a judgement heuristic or they may indicate a failure to correct the error once the intuition was articulated.
  • Author(s):
    Ahmad Parsian and Ali Rejali
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    In order to meet the goal of popularizing statistical concepts in Iranian society at large, the Iranian Statistical Society (IRSS), in cooperation with the Iranian Association of Mathematics Teachers' Societies (IAMTS), have convinced the Ministry of Education to include one statistics course in the national school curriculum. Unfortunately, due to the lack of statistics specialists in the school system, this course has been usually taught by teachers of mathematics, who often confuse statistical thinking with statistical methods, and do not realize that there is a difference between mathematical and statistical reasoning. Hence we have started preparing these teachers to teach statistics using proper teaching methods. In this paper, we present the activities of the Isfahan Mathematics House (IMH) on the professional development of mathematics teachers and their impact on improvement of statistics education.

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