Statistics

  • Sep 9, 2019 - 9:30pm
    Walter Smith (Haverford College); Greg Crowther (Everett Community College)

    The goal of the "Quick Twenty" project is to create a quick and fun introduction to STEM songs in each field (biology, math, etc.), making it easy for instructors and administrators to understand how songs can be used for education, and leading to wider adoption of STEM songs for teaching. We think that a "quick twenty list" in each field (not intended to be an objective and authoritative ranking; more like "twenty diverse examples of good songs") will accomplish this.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 2:30pm
    Lawrence Mark Lesser, PhD, The University of Texas at El Paso (TX)

    We posit that a key factor in how effective songs are in students' motivation, engagement, and learning is how interactive the song experience is for students. We articulate and tour a continuum of interactivity, illustrated with examples that are grounded in the context of core learning objectives in mathematics and statistics for students in high school or college, but applicable to virtually any subject matter.

  • Sep 9, 2019 - 7:05pm
    Greg Crowther (Everett Community College); Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso)

    Thousands of STEM songs exist (the singaboutscience.org database alone has over 7000), but they vary widely in how readily a teacher can use them in her class. For some teachers, it may be enough that a song exists on the learning objective at hand, but for (probably, most) teachers, a song is not a self-contained lesson and it makes a huge difference if the song is supported by accompanying resources.

  • Sep 9, 2018 - 7:10pm
    Larry Lesser (University of Texas at El Paso)

    Journals such as the MAA's Convergence reflect the value and interest in using the history of mathematics in the teaching of mathematics. History and song share goals of motivating and humanizing content for students in STEM classes. Illustrated with the specific context of mathematics/statistics class (but applicable to other STEM areas as well), this poster overviews rationale and criteria for use of such songs -- whether instructor-created or student-created -- and includes several examples (e.g., biography songs, key moments in the discipline, etc.) and resources.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 5:30pm
    Mary McLellan, Aledo High School (TX)

    This presentation focuses on the qualities and quantity of song usage to enhance student learning and depth of understanding. As an AP Statistics teacher, I incorporate over 45 songs into my curriculum to enhance and reinforce everyday learning. This, in turn, has allowed my students to get past basic knowledge and focus on enrichment. I will take you through my song-making process and show you the various ways that my students are able to access the songs. Use of iMovie, YouTube, and Google Sound Cloud will be touched upon.

  • Sep 9, 2018 - 6:15pm
    Mary McLellan, Aledo High School (TX)

    This presentation focuses on the qualities and quantity of song usage to enhance student learning and depth of understanding. As an AP Statistics teacher, I incorporate over 50 songs into my curriculum to enhance and reinforce everyday learning. This, in turn, has allowed my students to get past basic knowledge and focus on enrichment. I will take you through my song-making process and show you the various ways that my students are able to access the songs. Use of iMovie, YouTube, and Google Sound Cloud will be touched upon.

  • Sep 9, 2019 - 6:55pm
    Alexandra Foran & Dianne Goldsby (Texas A&M University)

    The presentation will demonstrate the use of music to introduce beginning statistics topics, using an "oldie but goodie" song. The demonstration illustrates how to engage students actively in counting, frequency tables, and graphs - counting words, phrases or musical beats; recording these; and creating graphs to display the generated data. Then, the activity examines using a more recent song appropriate for grade levels 6 – 10 (depending on course set-up) or pre-service teachers to create a frequency table and graph of the data.