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Statistics Education

  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.

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  • This online booklet, Start Teaching with R, by Randall Pruim, Nicholas J. Horton, and Daniel T. Kaplan comes out of the Mosaic project. It describes how to get started teaching Statistics using R, and gives teaching tips for many ideas in the course, using R commands.

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  • A quote that can be used in discussing the value and wide applicability of simulation for understanding statistical concepts and applying statistical methods. The quote is by American Statistical educator Christine Franklin (1956 - ) and is found in a 2013 interview with her conducted by Allan Rossman in the Journal of Statistics Education (volume 21, number 3).
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  • A quote for use in a statistics education course to initiate conversations about the key elements that foster student learning. The quote is by American Statistics Education Researcher Joan Garfield (1951 - ) from the University of Minnesota. The quote appears in her article "How Students Learn Statistics" in the International Statistical Review (1995; p. 25-34).
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  • "Solving Problems" is a poem by Scottish poet Eveline Pye from Glasgow Caledonin University. The poem was originally published in the September 2011 issue of the bimonthly magazine Significance, in an article about Eveline Pye's statistical poetry. "Solving Problems" might be used in course discussions of the importance of practice with real world data in developing statistical thinking, reasoning, and problem solving skills.
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  • "Shorn of all subtlety and led naked out of the protective fold of educational research literature, there comes a sheepish little fact: lectures don’t work nearly as well as many of us would like to think." A quote by George Cobb from his 1992 paper "Teaching Statistics," in Heeding the Call for Change: Suggestions for Curricular Action, ed. Lynn Steen, MAA Notes Number 22, 3-43. The quote is a well-phrased reminder that listening to lectures is not an effective way for students to learn.
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  • "America is shamefully inadequate at teaching statistics. A student can travel from kindergarten to a Ph.D. without ever encountering the subject. Yet statistics are ubiquitous in life, and so should be statistical reasoning." A quote by American economist Alan S. Blinder (1945 - ) that can be used for discussing the importance of statistics and statistical reasoning. The quote appeared in the New York Times Sunday Book Review on December 27, 2103 where Dr. Blinder was commenting on the importance of "The Signal and the Noise," a popular book by statistician Nate Silver.
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  • A poem useful in teaching aspects about hypothesis testing, especially the caveat that unimportant differences may be deemed significant with a large sample size. The poem was written by Mariam Hermiz, a student at University of Toronto, Mississauga in Fall 2010 as part of an assignment in a biometrics class taught by Helene Wagner. The poem was awarded first place in the poetry category of the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing contest.

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  • ...experiment without mathematics will neither sufficiently discipline the mind or sufficiently extend our knowledge... is a quote by Scottish geophysicist Balfour Stewart (1828 - 1887). The quote is found in a letter from Stewart to Henry Roscoe of Owens College on June 2, 1870.

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  • December 12, 2006 webinar presented by Michelle Everson, University of Minnesota, and hosted by Jackie Miller, The Ohio State University. This webinar focuses on describing an introductory statistics course that is taught completely online. The structure of this course is described, and samples of different student assignments and activities are presented. Assessment data and student feedback about the course are also presented. Discussion focuses on issues that must be considered when developing and administering an online course, such as the instructor's role in the online course and ways to create an active learning environment in an online course.

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