Statistical Inference & Techniques

  • A song to discuss how a confidence interval made for a population parameter will be biased if the sample is biased (e.g. starting with a random sample of n=100 but then having individuals drop out one at a time based on a non-ignorable reason).  The song was written IN MARCH 2019 by Lawrence Lesser, The University of Texas at El Paso, and Dennis Pearl, Penn State University, using the mid-20th century recursive folk song "99 Bottles of Beer." The idea for the song came from an article by Donald Byrd of University of Indiana in the September 2010 issue of Math Horizons where he suggested using the song for various learning objectives in Mathematics Education.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This limerick was written in April 2021 by Larry Lesser of The University of Texas at El Paso to be used as a vehicle for​ discussing the issues and pitfalls of using .05 as a bright-line threshold for declaring statistical significance, in light of ASA recommendations.  The poe was also published in the June 2021 AmStat News.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song satirizing the use of fixed significance level hypothesis testing.  The song was written by Dennis K Pearl from Penn State University.  Lyrics may be sung to the tune of the Beatles 1967 hit "When I'm Sixty-Four." (Paul McCartney wrote the song in 1958).  The audio recording was produced by Nicolas Acedo with vocals by Alejandra Nunez Vargas, both students in the Commercial Music Program at The University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A video using dance to teach about concepts involved with sampling error and the standard error of a statistic.  This 2013 video is from the “Dancing Statistics” series developed by Lucy Irving from Middlesex University (UK) funded by a BPS Public Engagement grant and additional funding from IdeasTap.  Full credits are within the video.   The Dancing Statistics project is described at https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00050/full

    The video also comes with teaching notes for viewing by instructors who are logged into CAUSEweb.org. 

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to be used in discussing the Sign test (based on whether an observation is above or below a specific value) and the Wilcoxon test (based on ordering the observations).  The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in December 2020.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A pun to start a discussion of the use of a sign test.  The joke was written by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University in 2020.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon that can used to help discuss the difference between large and small datasets and the kinds of issues involved in analyzing them and the questions that can be answered with them. The cartoon was used in the April 2020 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was written by Eric Vance from the University of Colorado Boulder. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon that can be used in a discussion of prediction – and the difference between the accuracy of a single prediction and quantifying the level of accuracy for a prediction method. The cartoon was used in the May 2019 CAUSE cartoon caption contest and the winning caption was written by Mickey Dunlap from the University of Georgia. The cartoon was drawn by British cartoonist John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea by Dennis Pearl from Penn State University. A co-winning caption in the May 2019 contest was “I see you come from a long line of statisticians," written by Douglas VanDerwerkenz from the U.S. Naval Academy. Doug's clever pun can be related to the multiple testing problem by talking about how a fortune teller will get some predictions right if they make a long line of them.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about confidence intervals and the quality of estimates made by a model. The cartoon is number 2311 (May, 2020) from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a Creative Commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about Type I and Type II errors as well as providing a comical take on other kinds of errors that can occur with statistical inference. The cartoon is number 2303 (May, 2020) from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a Creative Commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages