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Probability

  • A quote that might be used in examining the actual chance for winning lottery. The quote is by American author and social commentator Fran Lebowitz (1950 - ) and appeared in the 1994 book "Glibquips: Funny Words by Funny Women" edited by Roz Warren.
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  • A quote to aid in discussing the foundational idea in statistics of the importance of understanding the nature of uncertainty. The quote is by Israeli-American educator, computer scientist, and co-founder of the Coursera online platform Daphne Koller (1968 - ). The quote is found in the May 3, 2008 New York Times story on Dr. Koller.
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  • A quote to aid in discussing the idea that uncertainty is undesirable but knowledge of it is desirable in statistics. The quote is by British actress and writer Frances Anne Kemble (1809 – 1893) written in 1838 and quoted in the 1972 book Fanny Kemble Wister, editor, "Fanny: The American Kemble: her journals and unpublished letters."
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  • Rseek.org is a search engine for R resources. Type any topic in the search box, and get resources that are R specific. You can further narrow your search to just articles, books, packages, support, or "for beginners."

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  • A game to help with the active learning of the kinds of applied scenarios that are appropriately modeled by distributions covered in an upper division undergraduate or masters level probability course. The game is part of the Distributome.org probability resources developed by Ivo Dinov (University of Michigan), Dennis Pearl (Penn State University), and Kyle Siegrist (University of Alabama).
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  • A cartoon to be used for discussing the meaning of probability statements in the media such as when you hear there's a 25% chance of rain in the forecast. The cartoon was used in the July 2016 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. The winning caption was submitted by Michael Huberty from University of Minnesota., a student at Belgrade High School. The drawing was created by John Landers using an idea from Dennis Pearl. Other honorable mentions for captions that rose to the top of the judging that month included "A data set with seasonality" written by Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso; "ANOVA – Analysis of Varied Atmospheres," written by Deb Sedik from Bucks County Community College: and "Variability matters!" written by Debmalya Nandy, a student at Penn State University. (to use this cartoon with an alternate caption simply download and replace the caption using a bolded comic sans font)
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  • A cartoon to be used in discussing the Elevator Paradox or other elevator related probability problems. The cartoon was used in the January 2017 CAUSE cartoon caption contest. The winning caption was written by Larry Lesser at The University of Texas at El Paso, while the drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl.
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  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.

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  • These slides from the 2014 ICOTS workshop describe a minimal set of R commands for Introductory Statistics. Also, it describes the best way to teach them to students. There are 61 slides that start with plotting, move through modeling, and finish with randomization.
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  • "A Given A" is a song that Lawrence Mark Lesser from The University of Texas of El Paso adapted from his poem "P(A|A)" that was originally published in the January 2017 Journal of Humanistic Mathematics. In addition to providing a vehicle for general discussion (about pitfalls of post hoc analysis, multiple comparisons, or confusing the direction of causation or conditioning), the song may spark particularly lively discussion with the second verse's reference to the Bible Code, popularized by Michael Drosnin's so-named books and discussed in 1994 and 1999 papers in Statistical Science.
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