Probability

  • A song to help students confront the "equiprobability bias". Lyrics and music were written by Lawrence Mark Lesser of University of Texas at El Paso. The song won an honorable mention in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for use in non-profit education settings.
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  • A song to teach about Benford's Law for the probability distribution of first digits in real data. The lyrics are copyright by Lawrence Mark Lesser as a parody of Harry Nilsson's "One" made popular in 1969 by "Three Dog Night". "One is the Likeliest Number" was first published in the Spring 2011 issue of "Teaching Statistics". Free for use in non-profit education settings. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • A poem for teaching about the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of estimators. The poem was written by Ming-Lun Ho, Chabot College. It won third place in the non-song category of the 2015 A-Mu-Sing competition.
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  • Indeed, the laws of chance are just as necessary as the causal laws themselves. is a quote of quantum physicist David J. Bohm (1917- 1992). The quote appears on page 23 of his 1957 book "Causality and Chance in Modern Physics". The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.
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  • There is no free hunch. is quote by American psychologist and political scientist Robert P. Abelson (1928 - 2005). The quote is found on page 142 of his 1995 book "Statistics as a Principled Argument". It is referred to as "Abelson's Sixth Law" in a discussion of the generalizability of estimated effects.
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  • Lest men suspect your tale untrue, Keep probability in view. is a quote by English poet and playwright John Gay (1685 - 1732). The quote is the first two lines of the poem "The Painter who pleased Nobody and Everybody," which is fable number 18 from the from the 1727 collection "Fables" volume 1.
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  • There is no such thing as luck; there is only adequate or inadequate preparation to cope with a statistical universe. is a quote by American Science fiction writer Robert Anson Heinlein (1907-1988). The quote appears at the begiining of section 2 of his 1958 serialized novel "Have Space Suit - Will Travel".
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  • On this site, students can practice classifying statistics problems. They first click to check the statistical methods that they want to practice classifying. Then they click the "Submit" button to get a description of a research project that involves a statistical technique. Students then click on the technique that will most likely be used in the project. If they choose the incorrect answer, they must read the hint and try again. When they get something correct, they click on the "Next" button to try another problem.
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  • This simulation illustrates least squares regression and how the least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals. The applet demonstrates, in a visual manner, various concepts related to least squares regression. These include residuals, sum of squares, the mean line, how the line of best fit is determined, and how the line of least squares solution minimizes the sum of the squared residuals.
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  • StatKey is the analysis package to accompany the textbook "Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data." StatKey includes interactive applets to describe and graph data, engage in bootstrapping and randomization tests, and explore sampling distributions and theoretical distributions.
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