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One Numerical Variable

  • I abhor averages. I like the individual case. A man may have six meals one day and none the next, making an average of three meals per day, but that is not a good way to live. A quote by American Supreme Court Justice Louis Dembitz Brandeis (1856 - 1951) as quoted in "Brandeis: A Free Man's Life" by Alpheus Thomas Mason Viking Press, 1946; page 145). The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • Variability is the law of life, and as no two faces are the same, so no two bodies are alike, and no two individuals react alike and behave alike under the abnormal conditions which we know as disease. A quote by Canadian physician and medical educator Sir William Osler (1859 - 1919). The quote appears in William Osler: Aphorisms from his bedside teachings and writings, (Henry Schuman; 1950, page 104).

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  • This Haiku was written by Dr. Nyaradzo Mvududu of the Seattle Pacific University School of Education. The poem took first place in the 2007 A-Mu-sing competition.

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  • A cartoon about the perception that statistics exams are difficult. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.

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  • Statistic Acrostic is a poem by statistics educator Lawrence Mark Lesser and biostatistician Dennis K. Pearl that covers several statistical concepts using only 26 words (one starting with each letter of the alphabet).

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  • This activity explains the important features of a distribution: shape, center, spread, and unusual features. It also covers how to determine the difference between mean and median, and their respective measures of spread, as well as when to apply them to a particular distribution. Graphical displays such as: histograms and boxplots are also introduced in this activity. The corresponding data set for this activity is found at the following web address: http://www.causeweb.org/repository/ACT/food.txt

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  • This applet generates confidence intervals for means or proportions. The options for confidence intervals for means include "z with sigma," "z with s," or "t." The options for confidence intervals for proportions are "Wald," "Adjusted Wald," or "Score." Users set the population parameters, sample size, number of intervals, and confidence level. Click "Sample," and the applet will graph the intervals. Intervals shown in green contain the true population mean or proportion, while intervals in red do not. The true mean or proportion is shown by a blue line. The applet displays the proportion of intervals containing the population parameter for each sample and a running total of all the samples. Users can also click on a particular interval to display the numerical interval or sort the displayed confidence intervals from smallest to largest. This applet is part of a collection designed to accompany the textbook "Investigating Statistical Concepts, Applications, and Methods" (ISCAM) and is used in Exploration 4.3 on page 327, Investigation 4.3.6 on page 331, and Exploration 4.4 on page 350. This applet also supplements "Workshop Statistics: Discovery with Data," 2nd edition, Activity 19-5 on page 403. Additional materials written for use with these applets can be found at http://www.mathspace.com/NSF_ProbStat/Teaching_Materials/rowell/final/16_cireview_bc322_2.doc and http://www.mathspace.com/NSF_ProbStat/Teaching_Materials/rowell/final/15_sampdistreview_bc322_1.doc.
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  • Chance is only the measure of our ignorance. A quote from French mathematician and physicist Jules Henri Poincare (1854 - 1912) found in "The Foundations of Science", page 395, The Science Press, 1913. The quote also appears in "Statistically Speaking: A dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither.

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  • This lecture example discusses calculating chance with probabilities (a ratio of occurrence to the whole) or odds (a ratio of occurrence to nonoccurrence). It presents a clinical example of measuring the chance of initiating breastfeeding among 1000 new mothers. Tables are provided in pdf format.
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  • This NSF funded project provides worksheets and laboratories for introductory statistics. The overview page contains links to 9 worksheets that can be done without technology, which address the topics of obtaining data, summarizing data, probability, regression and correlation, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. The page also contains twelve laboratories that require the use of technology. Data sets are provided in Minitab format.
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