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One Numerical Variable

  • This page will calculate the factorial of any number.
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  • This glossary defines and explains statistical terms for introductory students. The glossary can be shown in alphabetical order or in suggested learning order. Click on the topic of interest to see the definition. Use the arrows at the bottom to proceed to the next topic or click the blue dot to return to the contents page.
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  • CAST contains three complete introductory statistics courses, one advanced statistical methods course, and additional modules. Each introductory course presents the same topics, but with different applications. The first is a general version, the second is a biometric version with examples relating to biological, agricultural and health sciences, and the third is a business version. Each course comes in a student version and a lecture version. The additional modules cover Multiple and Nonlinear Regression, Quality Control, and Simulation. Registration is required, but free. Individuals or classes can register.
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  • This applet demonstrates the Central Limit Theorem. First, select a distribution (Normal, Uniform, Skewed, Custom) and add or delete data points by clicking on the graph. Then, sample from the parent population and the distribution of the sample mean is shown. Users can also choose to see the distribution of the median, standard deviation, variance, and range.
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  • This applet demonstrates the Binomial distribution by simulating Galton's Board, dropping balls through a triangular array of nails. When a ball hits a nail, it has a 50 percent chance of falling to the left or the right. Because Galton's Board consists of a series of experiments, the piles under the board are the sum of n random variables, where n is the number of rows of nails on the board.
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  • Song includes vocabulary from fitting models, including outliers and assumptions. May be sung to tune of "You've Got Your Models" (The Fortunes). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song playfully celebrates Bayesian inference and includes various vocabulary such as coherence, prior, and exchangeable. May be sung to the tune of "Strangers in the Night" (Kaenpfert/Singleton/Snyder). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.
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  • Song celebrates Bayesian inference, includes verbal form of Bayes theorem. May be sung to the tune of "Who (Stole My Heart Away)?" (Jerome Kern)
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  • The textbook for this course discusses cross-cultural variations in household structure, as well as changes across time in household structure in the United States. The purpose of this exercise is to examine variations in household structure in the United States according to race and historical period. By the end of the exercise students should have a better appreciation of the fact that household structure in the U.S. is very fluid and that changes over time in household structure have not progressed uniformly for all race groups.
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  • This module is designed to illustrate the effects of selection bias on the observed relationship between premarital cohabitation and later divorce. It also serves as a review of key methodological concepts introduced in the first part of the course.
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