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  • This webpage provides an active learning lesson for linear regression. Resources include an in-class student activity sheet for two different levels of classes (Algebra I and Junior), a PowerPoint showing faces of famous people, and sheet with updated (to the end of current year) actual ages of the celebrities.
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  • On this site, students can practice classifying statistics problems. They first click to check the statistical methods that they want to practice classifying. Then they click the "Submit" button to get a description of a research project that involves a statistical technique. Students then click on the technique that will most likely be used in the project. If they choose the incorrect answer, they must read the hint and try again. When they get something correct, they click on the "Next" button to try another problem.
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  • This YouTube channel includes a series of video interviews between John McGready and some of his colleagues from Johns Hopkins University. The videos are meant to highlight the importance of biostatistics as a core driver of public health discovery, the importance of statistical reasoning in the research process, and how the fundamentals that are covered in an introductory biostatistics course are the framework for more advanced methodology.
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  • The song may be used to teach the importance of a good graphical display in presenting statistical data. May be sung to the tune of "Hit Me With Your Best Shot" (Eddie Schwartz, Pat Benatar, 1980). An earlier version appeared in Spring 2011 issue of Teaching Statistics. Lyrics by Lawrence Lesser, University of Texas at El Paso. version here introduced at the 2013 U.S. Conference On Teaching Statistics.
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  • December 14, 2010 T&L webinar presented by Dianna Spence & Brad Bailey (North Georgia College & State University) and hosted by Jackie Miller (The Ohio State University). When instructors have their students implement "real-world" projects in statistics, a number of questions arise: Where can students locate real data to analyze? What kinds of meaningful research questions can we help students to formulate? What aspects of statistical research can be covered in a project? What are reasonable methods for evaluating the student's work? The presenters will share resources developed during an NSF-funded study to develop and test curriculum materials for student projects in statistics, using linear regression and t-test scenarios.
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  • This site is a collection of interesting stories in the news that relate to statistics, major league baseball standings, links to textbooks, and links to applets. It also contains some reflections on statistical issues from retired professor John Marden (from University of Illiois at Urbana-Champaign).
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  • This site is a collection of resources related to experiments. The site includes references, resources, and articles related to the scientific method, experimental research, ethics in research, and research design. It also includes tips on writing scientific papers, and there are several statistics tutorials on the site. Another interesting feature of the site is a collection of case studies that include descriptions of famous research studies in fields like social psychology, sociology, physics, biology, and medicine.
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  • Cartoon to be used in talking about probability models (the process of drawing objects from an urn as a basic probability model goes back at least to Jacob Bernoulli's 1713 paper Ars conjectandi). Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to help in teaching the importance of labeling the axes of a graph. The cartoon is number 833 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.
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  • I keep saying that the sexy job in the next 10 years will be statisticians is a quote from American economist Hal R. Varian (1947 -) quoted in an August 5, 2009 "New York Times" article "For Today's Graduate, Just One Word: Statistics," written by reporter Steve Lohr. The article may be found online at www.nytimes.com/2009/08/06/technology/06stats.html
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