Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Sound

  • Song about the need to show a significant result in order to have a manuscript published. May be sung to the tune of Robert Feldman, Gerald Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer's 1963 song "My Boyfriend's Back," popularized by The Angels. Lyrics by Marc Coram and Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song about the difficulty of graduate courses in statistics ad probability. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's 1968 song "Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da." Lyrics by Armin Swartzman and Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song about bootstrap resampling methods and their history. May be sung to the tune of Don McLean's 1971 song "American Pie." Lyrics by Giles Hooker (May, 2004). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song advocating a preference for Bayesian inferential procedures. May sing to the tune of Neil Diamond's 1966 song "I'm a Believer" made popular by the Monkees. Lyrics by Bradley Carlin (2002). Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Accompanying musical track was recorded Sunday September 16, 2002. The lyrics were written by Brad for the Valencia 7 conference, Tenerife, Spain, June 2002;and was first performed there by the Bayesian Band (Brad Carlin, Mark Glickman, and David Heckerman). The lyrics may be found in volume 37, issue 1 of "IMS Bulletin" and in the "Bayesian Songbook" (www.biostat.umn.edu/~brad/cabaret.html).

    0
    No votes yet
  • The primary themes of this parody involve elementary probability and the importance of graphical summaries. It may be sung to the tune of "Big Yellow Taxi" by Canadian songwriter Joni Mitchell, 1970. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song about the chi-square goodness-of-fit test. May be sung to the tune of James Rado, Gerome Ragni, and Gai MacDermot's 1969 song "Aquarius" from the musical "Hair." Lyrics by Lawrence Mark Lesser. Musical accompaniment realization are by Joshua Lintz and vocals are by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Statz 4 Life is a 5 minute, 13 second video that provides a fun review of statistical inference topics (for example, the theme of examining observed differences in the numerator and error in the denominator). The video was first shown on May 18, 2006 in Chuck Tate's research methods course, while he was a graduate student in the Department of Psychology at the University of Oregon. The rappers are (in order of appearance): Jeph Loucks, Chuck Tate, Chelan Weaver, and Cara Lewis. Jennifer Simonds provides the singing talent. Credits: Concept, lyrics, and cinematography by Chuck Tate, audio mixing by Jeph Loucks, and video editing by Chuck Tate and Jeph Loucks. The background beat is Nelly's song "Grillz," of which this video is a parody.

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song addresses strategies and myths for playing a state lottery, incorporating concepts of probability, independence, and expected value. May be sung to the tune of "The Gambler" (Don Schlitz). This song kicked off USCOTS 2009 and an earlier version appeared in Winter 2002 "STATS". Recorded June 26, 2009 at the OSU Whisper Room: Larry Lesser, vocals; Justin Slauson, engineer.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • A song about the fit of linear regression, describing the difference between observed and fitted values and related aspects. May be sung to the tune of "Mexican Hat Dance" (traditional). Recorded June 26, 2009 at the OSU Whisper Room: Larry Lesser, vocals/guitar; Justin Slauson, engineer. This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

    0
    No votes yet
  • Song contains concepts and terms associated with linear regression. May be sung to the tune of "I Walk the Line" (Johnny Cash). Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages