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  • This song describes the benefits of using a prior distribution to capture information already known about a topic under study. The lyrics are by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Shocking Blue's 1969 song "Venus." The accomanying mp3 recording was produced on May 17, 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocal and guitar)

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  • This song extols the value of Bayesian thinking. The song was written by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Zombie's 1968 song "Time of the Season" written by Rod Argent. The mp3 was recorded on May 24 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocals). This song was first performed live in June 2006 at "Eighth Valencia World Meeting on Bayesian Statistics" in Benidorm, Spain, by Mark Glickman, Brad Carlin, Jennifer Hill, and David Heckerman.

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  • This song describes the pitfalls of using a steep prior in a Bayesian analysis that is not based on an underlying understanding of the problem. The lyrics were written by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Four Seasons' 1975 song "December, 1963 (Oh What a Night)" written by Bob Gaudio and Judy Parker. The mp3 was recorded July 9, 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocals).

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  • A song about two-tailed tests for hypotheses about the mean that may be sung to the tune of the 1966 song "Break on Through (to the other side)" by the Doors. Lyrics by Dennis Pearl of The Ohio State University. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song to teach various concepts in probability. Written by Mary Pat Campbell for Mathcamp 2002 at Colorado College. May be sung to the tune of "Take a Chance on Me" by ABBA. Musical accompaniment realization by Joshua Lintz and vocals by Mariana Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • This song that may be used in teaching about box plots. The lyrics were written by Alan Reifman, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Texas Tech University. The lyrics may be sung to the tune of Billy Joel's 1978 song "Big Shot." The lyrics won first prize in the song category of the 2009 A-Mu-sing contest. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song for teaching concepts about regression and correlation written by Alan Reifman, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Texas Tech University. The lyrics may be sung to the tune of Tommy James and Bod King's 1971 song "Draggin' the Line." Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about the benefits of the Bayesian approach to statistics. May be sung to the tune of Sonny and Cher's 1965 song "I Got You Babe." Lyrics by Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization by Joshua Lintz male vocals by Joshua Lintz and female vocals by Marianna Sandoval from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song covering a variety of statistical topics. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon's 1969 song "Give Peace a Chance." Lyrics by Armin Schwartzman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about the pleasure of teaching statistics when the class is engaged. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's 1963 song "I Want to Hold Your Hand." Lyrics by Armin Schwartzman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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