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  • A song parody to be sung about one's favorite statistics course. The lyrics won an honorable mention in the song category of the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing contest and were written by Robert Carver of Stonehill College. The song may be sung to the tune of George and Ira Gershwin's 1937 classic "They Can't Take That Away from Me." Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song about examining the assumptions in statistical procedures especially dealing with skewed distributions. The lyrics were written by Robert Carver of Stonehill College and were awarded second place in the song category of the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. The song is a parody of the 1961 classic pop song "Runaround Sue" written by Ernie Maresca and Dion DiMucci and sung by Dion backed by the vocal group, The Del-Satins. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • A song for teaching ideas about hypothesis testing including interpretation of significance and the difference between significance and practical relevance. Lyrics written by Denise Tran, a student at University of Toronto, Mississauga in Fall 2010 as part of an assignment in a biometrics class taught by Helene Wagner. May be sung to the tune of the 2001 Grammy award winning song "Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me)" by the rock band Train (Patrick Monahan, Robert Hotchkiss, James Stafford, Scott Underwood, and Charlie Colin). The song won first place in the song category and best overall entry in the 2011 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition.

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  • This 6 minute 39 second video can be used to teach the difference between correlation and causation. For example, that a relationship between X and Y might be explained by X causing Y, Y causing X, or a third factor that drives them both. The video is episode #109 (Nov 10, 2009) in the Psych Files podcast series produced and hosted by Michael A. Britt, Ph.D. at www.thepsychfiles.com. Video is free to use in the classroom or on course websites under a non-commercial ShareAlike creative commons license.

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  • Do not make things easy for yourself by speaking or thinking of data as if they were different from what they are; and do not go off from facing data as they are, to amuse your imagination by wishing they were different from what they are. Such wishing is pure waste of nerve force, weakens your intellectual power, and gets you into habits of mental confusion. is a quote by English mathematician and mathematics educator Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916). The quote is found on page 7 of her 1909 book "Philosophy and Fun of Algebra", (C.W. Daniel, Ltd.) written to bring then modern mathematical ideas to children. The book is available online through Project Gutenberg at www.gutenberg.org/files/13447/13447-pdf.pdf
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  • A cartoon to use when talking about confidence intervals. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • A cartoon to use in teaching about the dangers of extrapolation in the context of predicting the future. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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  • November 23, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Stacey Hancock, Reed College, Jennifer Noll, Portland State University, Sean Simpson, Westchester Community College, and Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. Many instructors ask students to demonstrate the frequentist notion of probability using a simulation early in an intro stats course. Typically, the simulation involves dice or coins, which give equal (and known) probabilities. How about a simulation involving an unknown probability? This webinar discusses an experiment involving rolling (unbalanced) pigs. Since the probabilities are not equal, this experiment also allows the instructor to have students think about the concept of fairness within games.

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  • A song parody by Steve Sodergren (a.k.a. Al G Bra: see www.reverbnation.com/algbra) that may be sung to the tune of "With or Without You" by U2. Can be used to stimulate conversation about confidence intervals and the typical use of 95% confidence in the media when it is not otherwise reported (i.e. being within plus or minus two standard deviations for intervals based on a normal sampling distribution). This song appears on Al G Bra's "Hotel Califormula" CD.
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  • It's Just STATA Code To Me is a song written by Dorry Segev of Johns Hopkins University that reflects on a number of issues in biostatistical data analysis. The song may be sung to the tune of Billy Joel's 1980 hit song "It's Still Rock and Roll To Me." The lyrics were written for Marie DIener-West's Biostatistics 653 course at Johns Hopkins that regularly asks students to create songs, videos, and poetry with biostatistics themes.

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