Literature Index

Displaying 41 - 50 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Godino, J. D., Batanero, M. C., & Canizares, M. J.
    Year:
    1994
    Abstract:
    Here we approach the complex nature of probabilistic reasoning, even at its most basic level, and its evaluation through written texts. We also present the conclusions of a theoretical and experimental study of two tests (Green, 1983 and Fischbein, 1984) designed to evaluate primary probabilistic intuitions, reaching the conclusion of the need for them to be mutually complementary in order to improve the validity of their content, both for including items from the different components of probabilistic reasoning and from the universe of task and contextual variables.
  • Author(s):
    Hilton Short, Boyle, Braithwaite, Brookes,<br>Mustard and Saundage
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    This study measures the evaluation of teaching given by students against their final outcomes<br>in a subject. The subject in question had an enrolment across four campuses of 1073 students<br>at the time of the evaluation and is a statistics subject that is core (i.e. compulsory) to several<br>undergraduate business degrees. This study is based on the 373 students (34.8%) who<br>responded to the survey, and their final results. The evaluations were open for a period of six<br>weeks leading up to and just after the final exam. The study matches the responses to the<br>question "This unit was well taught" to final outcomes, in an attempt to ascertain whether<br>there is a link between student evaluation of teaching and performance. The analysis showed<br>that for the students who self-selected to complete the survey:<br>&bull; Students who perform well in the subject generally give higher scores than lower<br>performing students.<br>&bull; The same general pattern prevailed when other secondary factors were taken into<br>account, such as, when the evaluation was completed, campus and gender.<br>&bull; The timing of when a student completes the evaluation seems the most important of<br>these secondary variables.<br>&bull; In general, students who submitted their evaluations after the exam gave higher ratings<br>if they eventually obtained a pass grade or better, and lower grades if they failed.
  • Author(s):
    Carmelita Ragasa
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    The objective of the study is to determine if there is a significant difference in the effects of the treatment<br>and control groups on achievement as well as on attitude as measured by the posttest. A class of 38<br>sophomore college students in the basic statistics taught with the use of computer-assisted instruction and<br>another class of 15 students with the use of the traditional method from the University of the East, Manila<br>(SY 2003-2004) were the focus of this study. The research method used was the quasi-experimental, nonequivalent<br>control group design. The statistical tool was the Multiple Analysis of Covariance. The researcher<br>made use of the CD-ROM prepared by Math Advantage (1997) to serve as the teaching medium for the<br>experimental group. The following summarizes the findings of the study. The achievement posttest of the<br>treatment group has higher estimated marginal means than the control group and it is reversed in the attitude<br>posttest. Using Hotelling's Trace for the multivariate test, the achievement pretest, attitude pretest, and the<br>two groups have a significant effect on the dependent variables, achievement posttest and attitude posttest.<br>Using covariates to control for the effects of additional variables that might affect performance the attitude<br>pretest accounts for about 56% of the variability in the two groups while achievement pretest about 15%.<br>Levene's test shows that the homogeneity of variances assumption between the two groups is met for<br>achievement posttest but not for attitude posttest. The univariate effects for achievement posttest that are<br>significant are achievement pretest, college entrance test overall score, and groups. The univariate effects<br>that are significant for attitude posttest are attitude pretest and high school general weighted average.
  • Author(s):
    delMas, R. C.
    Editors:
    Ben-Zvi, D. &amp; Garfield, J.
    Year:
    2004
    Abstract:
    The focus of this chapter is on the nature of mathematical and statistical reasoning. The chapter begins with a description of the general nature of human reasoning. This is followed by a description of mathematical reasoning as described by mathematicians along with recommendations by mathematics educators regarding educational experiences to improve mathematical reasoning. The literature on statistical reasoning is reviewed and findings from the general literature on reasoning are used to identify areas of statistical reasoning that students find most challenging. Statistical reasoning and mathematical reasoning are compared and contrasted, and implications for instruction and research are suggested.
  • Author(s):
    Croucher, J. S.
    Editors:
    Goodall, G.
    Year:
    2005
    Abstract:
    This article discusses some strategies for playing roulette, making use of the binomial distribution and Normal approximation.
  • Author(s):
    Ellen Gundlach, K. Andrew R. Richards, David Nelson, and Chantal Levesque-Bristol
    Year:
    2015
    Abstract:
    Web-augmented traditional lecture, fully online, and flipped sections, all taught by the same instructor with the same course schedule, assignments, and exams in the same semester, were compared with regards to student attitudes; statistical reasoning; performance on common exams, homework, and projects; and perceptions of the course and instructor. The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics-36 (SATS-36) instrument and eight questions from the Statistical Reasoning Assessment (SRA) were given both at the beginning and end of the semester to measure change. The students selected their own sections, but the students in the sections were similar demographically, with similar pre-course college grade point averages. The SATS-36 showed increases in affect, cognitive competence, and perceived easiness and decreases in value, interest, and effort from beginning to end of the semester for all sections. Only affect and perceived easiness showed any differences for section, with traditional higher than online on average for both. Results from the SRA questions showed an increase in correct statistical reasoning skills and decrease in misconceptions for all sections over the semester. Traditional students scored higher on average on all three exams, but there were no significant differences between sections on homework, the project, or on university evaluations of the course or instructor. Results are contextualized with prior educational research on course modalities, and proposals for future research are provided.
  • Author(s):
    Lee, C.
    Year:
    1999
    Abstract:
    This study is aimed at the investigation of the non-cognitive factors related to students' belief and attitude before and after taking an introductory statistics using an interview methodology. Of particular interest is to compare students' belief and attitude between students from a technology-rich class and from a traditional class.
  • Author(s):
    Lee, C.
    Year:
    1999
    Abstract:
    This study is aimed at the investigation of the non-cognitive factors related to students' beliefs and attitude before and after taking an introductory statistics course using an interview methodology. Of particular interest is to compare students' beliefs and attitude between students from a technology-rich class and from a traditional class. The purposes are (a) to investigate if students' attitude has changed after taking a technology-rich statistics class and their experience about technology, and (b) to compare if there is a dramatic difference between the technology-rich class and a traditional class before and after taking the course.
  • Author(s):
    Pereira-Mendoza, L.
    Editors:
    Davidson, R., &amp; Swift, J.
    Year:
    1986
    Abstract:
    This paper will concentrate on the role of statistics in the curriculum for the 5-11 age group. It is in the early years of schooling that the conceptual foundation is laid on which the secondary and tersary phases of a student's education are built. A brief overview of what and when certain topics are currently taught in the elementary schools in Britain, Canada, and the USA is presented.
  • Author(s):
    Packard, A. L., et al.
    Year:
    1993
    Abstract:
    The use of computer assisted instruction in teaching statistical concepts was studied. Students enrolled in classes in education who lacked statistical experience participated. Knowledge questions for pretest and posttest assessments were prepared from a pool of questions used in the statistics department of the College of Education at Virginia Tech. Software modules for this pilot study were created through computer software applications and implemented in a Windows 3.1 environment. Central limit theory was the concept presented, and it was presented in one of three different computer-mediated ways: (1) text, graphics, plus static interaction (TGS); (2) text, graphics, plus animated interaction (TGA); and (3) text, graphics, plus passive video (TGPV). Because the investigation was a pilot study to support further investigation, analyses were not developed in depth. Gains in knowledge were found, however. Participants were less enthusiastic about TGS than the other presentations, with TGA appealing to most. Issues for further study are discussed. (Contains 16 references.) (SLD)

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