Literature Index

Displaying 21 - 30 of 3326
  • Author(s):
    Single, R. M.
    Year:
    2000
    Abstract:
    The use of tangible examples can make the concepts of statistical sampling and survey design more meaningful for college students. These concepts are especially relevant with the advent of the 2000 Census and the debate over its use of statistical sampling.<br>In this paper, basic ideas from survey design are introduced using the 2000 Census as an example, in order to capitalize on the recent media attention. Then, these same concepts are applied to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Data for the 1993 NHIS can be accessed through the National Center for Health Statistics web site and simple analyses can be performed over the web to demonstrate the use of sampling weights. In addition, subsets of the data can be downloaded and analyzed using statistical software packages.<br>The methods of statistical sampling and the structure of a national survey have a variety of applications in the classroom, depending on the level of the course being taught. This paper discusses some of these applications and how to access and use these data as an effective teaching tool.
  • Author(s):
    Albert, J.
    Year:
    2002
    Abstract:
    An introductory statistics course is described that is entirely taught from a baseball perspective. Topics in data analysis, including methods for one batch, comparison of batches, and relationships, are communicated using current and historical baseball data sets. Probability is introduced by describing and playing tabletop baseball games. Inference is taught by first making the distinction between a player's "ability" and his "performance", and then describing how one can learn about a player's ability based on his season performance. Baseball issues such as the proper interpretation of situational and "streaky" data are used to illustrate statistical inference.
  • Author(s):
    Elfessi, A. &amp; Reineke, D. M.
    Year:
    2001
    Abstract:
    Many undergraduate students are introduced to frequentist or classical methods of parameter estimation such as maximum likelihood estimation, uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimation, and minimum mean square error estimation in a reliability, probability, or mathematical statistics course. Rossman, Short, and Parks (1998) present some thought provoking insights on the relationship between Bayesian and classical estimation using the continuous uniform distribution. Our aim is to explore these relationships using the exponential distribution. We show how the classical estimators can be obtained from various choices made within a Bayesian framework.
  • Author(s):
    Craig R.M. Mckenzie and Laurie A. Mikkelsen
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    When participants assess the relationship between two variables, each with levels of presence and absence, the two most robust phenomena are that: (a) observing the joint presence of the variables has the largest impact on judgment and observing joint absence has the smallest impact, and (b) participants' prior beliefs about the variables' relationship influence judgment. Both phenomena represent departures from the traditional normative model (the phi coefficient or related measures) and have therefore been interpreted as systematic errors. However, both phenomena are consistent with a Bayesian approach to the task. From a Bayesian perspective: (a) joint presence is normatively more informative than joint absence if the presence of variables is rarer than their absence, and (b) "failing" to incorporate prior beliefs is a normative error. Empirical evidence is reported showing that joint absence is seen as more informative than joint presence when it is clear that absence of the variables, rather than their presence, is rare.
  • Author(s):
    Misra, S. C., Sahai, H., Gore, A. P., &amp; Garrett, J. K.
    Editors:
    Posten, H. O.
    Year:
    1987
    Abstract:
    Recently, one of the compilers of this bibliography published a review of selected publications on the teaching of probability and statistics. A computerized listing of the complete bibliography was made available as a supplement on request. This report is an expanded and updated version of that work. It presents a listing of available literature on the teaching of probability and statistics.
  • Author(s):
    Kapadia, R.
    Editors:
    Bell, A., Low, B., &amp; Kilpatrick, J.
    Year:
    1984
    Abstract:
    In this short paper important strands of research in probabilistic notions will be critically presented, followed by an indication of the author's own research.
  • Author(s):
    Steiner, S. H., Hamada, M., Giddings White, B. J., Mosesova, V. K. S., Salloum, G.
    Year:
    2007
    Abstract:
    This article gives an example of how student-conducted experiments can enhance a course in the design of experiments. We focus on a project whose aim is to find a good mixture of water, soap and glycerin for making soap bubbles. This project is relatively straightforward to implement and understand. At its most basic level the project introduces students to mixture experiments and general issues in experimental design such as choosing and measuring an appropriate response, selecting a design, the effect of using repeats versus replicates, model building, making predictions, etc. To accommodate more advanced students, the project can be easily enhanced to draw on various areas of statistics, such as generalized linear models, robust design, and optimal design. Therefore it is ideal for a graduate level course as it encourages students to look beyond the basics presented in class.
  • Author(s):
    Spurrier, J. D.
    Year:
    2001
    Abstract:
    This article discusses a capstone course for undergraduate statistics majors at the University of South Carolina. The course synthesizes lessons learned throughout the curriculum and develops students' nonstatistical skills to the level expected of professional statisticians. Student teams participate in a series of inexpensive laboratory experiments that emphasize ideas and techniques of applied and mathematical statistics, mathematics, and computing. They also study modules on important nonstatistical skills. Students prepare written and oral reports. If a report is not of professional quality, the student receives feedback and repeats the report. All students leave the course with a better understanding of how the pieces of their education fit together and with a firm understanding of the communication skills required of a professional statistician.
  • Author(s):
    Paul J. Fields
    Year:
    2008
    Abstract:
    Although the mission of mathematics education departments or programs is to prepare the next generation of secondary education mathematics teachers, the question still remains, "Who should provide the training in statistics education for these future teachers?" We propose that statistics education should be provided by statisticians in collaboration with mathematics educators. We describe a model that has been designed recognizing how statistical reasoning differs from mathematical reasoning and implemented incorporating how classroom pedagogy is consequently affected.
  • Author(s):
    Jamis J. Perrett
    Year:
    2012
    Abstract:
    This article demonstrates how textbooks differ in their description of the term experimental unit. Advanced Placement Statistics teachers and students are often limited in their statistical knowledge by the information presented in their classroom textbook. Definitions and descriptions differ among textbooks as well as among different editions of the same textbook. Furthermore, many schools use older editions of textbooks rather than current editions that contain updated information and thus lose the benefit of improved discussions and clarifications. Advanced Placement Statistics teachers should be aware of this issue and seek additional training through workshops, additional textbooks, and webinars to increase and strengthen their knowledge and understanding of key statistical concepts. Textbook authors should be aware of teachers’ dependence on the authors’ presentation of topics and ensure that key topics like experimental unit are covered thoroughly. This article considers three prior Advanced Placement Statistics exam questions to illustrate how different Advanced Placement Statistics textbooks may have influenced students’ answers based on the textbooks’ authors’ treatment of experimental unit.

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