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Teaching Methods

  • This is a graduate level course/collection of lessons in analysis of variance (ANOVA), including randomization and blocking, single and multiple factor designs, crossed and nested factors, quantitative and qualitative factors, random and fixed effects, split plot and repeated measures designs, crossover designs and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Perfect for students and teachers alike looking to learn/acquire materials on ANOVA.

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  • This graduate level course offers an introduction into regression analysis. A researcher is often interested in using sample data to investigate relationships, with an ultimate goal of creating a model to predict a future value for some dependent variable. The process of finding this mathematical model that best fits the data involves regression analysis.  STAT 501 is an applied linear regression course that emphasizes data analysis and interpretation and is perfect for both students and teachers of statistics courses.

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  • Gapminder seeks to educate all on the importance of "factfulness" and of knowing and contextualizing the statistics that describe the state of our world.  Learn facts from across the globe such as average income, life expectancy, energy use, education levels, and much more.

    Download Gapminder’s slides, tools, posters, handouts, lesson plans, and presentations at this webpage.

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  • Gapminder seeks to educate all on the importance of "factfulness" and of knowing and contextualizing the statistics that describe the state of our world.  Learn facts from across the globe such as average income, life expectancy, energy use, education levels, and much more.

    This particular page gives teachers resources to use in their classrooms involving the tools and data found on Gapminder.

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  • This UC Berkeley Foundations of Data Science course combines three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? This course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social issues surrounding data analysis such as privacy and design.

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  • This text was written for an introductory class in Statistics suitable for students in Business, Communications, Economics, Psychology, Social Science, or liberal arts; that is, this is the first and last class in Statistics for most students who take it. It also covers logic and reasoning at a level suitable for a general education course.  SticiGui provides text, interactive tools, lecture videos, sample exam reviews, and more for a course in basic statistical concepts.  

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  • This page supports an in-class exercise that highlights several key Bayesian concepts. The scenario is as follows: a large paper bag contains pieces of candy with wrappings of different color, and we are interested in learning about the unknown proportion of yellow-wrapped pieces of candy. After completing the exercises, we will be familiar with the following concepts and ideas: probability distributions can quantify degree of beliefprior distributionposterior distributionsequential updatingconjugacy, Cromwell’s Rule (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cromwell's_rule), the data overwhelm the prior, Bayes factors, Savage-Dickey density ratio, sensitivity analysiscoherence.

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  • The goal of this text is to provide a broad set of topics and methods that will give students a solid foundation in understanding how to make decisions with data. This text presents workbook-style, project-based material that emphasizes real world applications and conceptual understanding. Each chapter contains:

    • An introductory case study focusing on a particular statistical method in order to encourage students to experience data analysis as it is actually practiced.
    • guided research project that walks students through the entire process of data analysis, reinforcing statistical thinking and conceptual understanding.
    • Optional extended activities that provide more in-depth coverage in diverse contexts and theoretical backgrounds. These sections are particularly useful for more advanced courses that discuss the material in more detail. Some Advanced Lab sections that require a stronger background in mathematics are clearly marked throughout the text.
    • Data sets from multiple disciplines and software instructions for Minitab and R.

    The text is highly adaptable in that the various chapters/parts can be taken out of order or even skipped to customize the course to your audience. Depending on the level of in-class active learning, group work, and discussion that you prefer in your course, some of this work might occur during class time and some outside of class. 

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  • The Global Terrorism Database (GTD) contains information about more than 140,000 terrorist incidents occurring between 1970 and 2014. The data in the GTD are gathered from information gathered through multiple news sources (LaFree, Dugan, & Miller, 2015). In this activity, we will study the extent to which chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons have been used so far. We analyze whether or not their past use fits with our perceptions. Have CBRN weapons been used successfully in the past? Which weapons are more historically dangerous (more fatalities, injuries) in the hands of terrorists? What are the implications of past usage of CBRN weapons compared to other weapons in determining our priorities in counter-terrorism policies?

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  • The NYPD lab uses interactive, online graphs to better understand patterns in stop and arrest data for the New York Police Department. These data were originally collected by New York Police Department officers and record information gathered as a result of stop question and frisk (SQF) encounters during 2006. These data were used in a study carried out, under contract to the New York City Police Foundation, by the Rand Corporation's Center on Quality Policing. The release of the study, "Analysis of Racial Disparities in the New York Police Department's Stop, Question, and Frisk Practices" (Rand Document TR-534-NYCPF, 2007) generated interest in making the data available for secondary analysis. This data collection contains information on the officer's reasons for initiating a stop, whether the stop led to a summons or arrest, demographic information for the person stopped, and the suspected criminal behavior."

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