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Multimedia

  • Song covering a variety of statistical topics. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon's 1969 song "Give Peace a Chance." Lyrics by Armin Schwartzman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about the need to show a significant result in order to have a manuscript published. May be sung to the tune of Robert Feldman, Gerald Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer's 1963 song "My Boyfriend's Back," popularized by The Angels. Lyrics by Marc Coram and Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about the difficulty of graduate courses in statistics ad probability. May be sung to the tune of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's 1968 song "Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da." Lyrics by Armin Swartzman and Matthew Finkelman (December, 2003). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song about bootstrap resampling methods and their history. May be sung to the tune of Don McLean's 1971 song "American Pie." Lyrics by Giles Hooker (May, 2004). This song is part of the "Stanford Statistics Songbook" found at www.bscb.cornell.edu/~hooker/StanfordStatisticsSongbook.pdf Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Song advocating a preference for Bayesian inferential procedures. May sing to the tune of Neil Diamond's 1966 song "I'm a Believer" made popular by the Monkees. Lyrics by Bradley Carlin (2002). Free to use for non-commercial educational purposes. Contact author to use in publications or for commercial purposes. Accompanying musical track was recorded Sunday September 16, 2002. The lyrics were written by Brad for the Valencia 7 conference, Tenerife, Spain, June 2002;and was first performed there by the Bayesian Band (Brad Carlin, Mark Glickman, and David Heckerman). The lyrics may be found in volume 37, issue 1 of "IMS Bulletin" and in the "Bayesian Songbook" (www.biostat.umn.edu/~brad/cabaret.html).

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  • The primary themes of this parody involve elementary probability and the importance of graphical summaries. It may be sung to the tune of "Big Yellow Taxi" by Canadian songwriter Joni Mitchell, 1970. Musical accompaniment realization and vocals are by Joshua Lintz from University of Texas at El Paso.

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  • Probability is a 2 minute 14 second video that can be used in discussing the probability of rare events (e.g. how many consecutive times must a coin land heads before you question whether it is a fair coin?). The video was written, shot, and edited by Sam Rapien in 2007. The music is by Brett Musil and Sam Rapien and the single cast member is Jon Anderson. Mr. Rapien made this video while a graduate student in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln.

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  • Submitting your spotlight presentation from USCOTS 2005 to CAUSEweb is an easy process, and you are in a prime position to submit your work! What better way to have your work showcased than in a peer-reviewed repository of contributions to statistics education? This Webinar will be an opportunity to talk about how to prepare your USCOTS spotlight for submission to CAUSEweb and to discuss the benefits of submission. Please join us to discuss how to put the spotlight on CAUSEweb.
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  • This collection of YouTube videos is designed to teach individuals how to use StatCrunch to enter data, graph data, obtain descriptive statistics, and conduct many different kinds of statistical analyses.

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  • This applet demonstrates the Binomial distribution by simulating Galton's Board, dropping balls through a triangular array of nails. When a ball hits a nail, it has a 50 percent chance of falling to the left or the right. Because Galton's Board consists of a series of experiments, the piles under the board are the sum of n random variables, where n is the number of rows of nails on the board.
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