Informal Learning

  • Sep 9, 2018 - 3:20pm
    Jeffrey "Dr Chordate" Moran

    We have in the US a large population of people who reject science, both as being boring and un-understandable, and as being antithetical to certain other philosophies/teachings. Just as songs are effective tools for teaching/ introducing science facts and concepts to students in a classroom setting, songs and humor can be used to reach this population of people, as well as entertain those folks who already engage in the pursuit of scientific interests, either professionally or for pleasure.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 8:00pm
    Jonny Berliner, University College London (UK)

    The presentation will report on a project based at Oxford University to write songs aimed at helping 5 researchers to create songs that they can use in the public engagement work. The presentation will outline the methodology used, will discuss the benefits for the researchers, and challenges faced in involving researchers in the song writing process.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 8:00pm
    Jennifer Publicover, Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts (Nova Scotia)

    Music can be used as a tool to complement other pedagogical approaches used in environmental education. The arts, including music, can experientially evoke emotion, spark dialogue, encourage innovative thinking, present diverse perspectives, cope with ambiguity and non-linearity, and influence the development of cultural norms.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 2:05pm
    Rabindra (Robby) Ratan, PhD, Michigan State University (MI)

    I wrote a rap song about the intersection of science and faith -- as an added verse to “When the Saints Go Marching In” -- which I first performed with a street band at the March for Science in Lansing, MI.  In a nutshell, the song argues that science requires faith, just like religion, and that the facts of science are often revised/updated, so dogma (in any direction) is dangerous. I'm not sure exactly what to do with the song ... add a beat? update the lyrics? make a music video? move on with my life to other projects? Also, I am curious about how people respond to the song.

  • Sep 9, 2019 - 7:20pm
    Jerry Appell (Executive Director of Rock In The Classroom)

    Learn how adult learners can use music as medium and a tool to creatively and effectively capture and learn informational content related to STEM (and life).

  • Sep 9, 2018 - 3:20pm
    Jeffrey "Dr Chordate" Moran

    We have in the US a large population of people who reject science, both as being boring and un-understandable, and as being antithetical to certain other philosophies/teachings. Just as songs are effective tools for teaching/ introducing science facts and concepts to students in a classroom setting, songs and humor can be used to reach this population of people, as well as entertain those folks who already engage in the pursuit of scientific interests, either professionally or for pleasure.

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 7:00pm
    Jon Chase, Freelance Science Communicator (UK)

    Science songs can often be seen in a one-dimensional way, i.e. "It's a song about genetics/ dinosaurs/space" or "It's a cool way to teach science" but science songs have different strengths and play to different needs in the listener. Some songs present factual statements that could be used as rhythm or rhyme based mnemonics; like jingles. Some songs portray an idea in a way that can help a listener to get a deeper understanding of it for example, a song about the roles scientists play in society or a song about a misunderstood concept (such as climate change or evolution).

  • Sep 9, 2017 - 8:00pm
    Eva Amsen, PhD, Freelance / Institute of Cancer Research (UK)

    Why do people sing about science? Science songs can be used as educational tool, but sometimes a science song has a different purpose. Singing about science can generate a sense of community, to build a connection with other scientists and science fans. In 2011, scientists widely shared a YouTube video of the Zheng lab at Baylor College of Medicine performing a science-themed parody of a Lady Gaga song. It was popular not just for the impressive performance and the well-known melody, but because it described familiar situations for anyone working in a biomedical lab.