Webinars

  • Does eye color depend on Gender? It Might Depend on Who or How you Ask

    Amy G. Froelich, Iowa State University
    Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 12:00pm ET
    As a part of an opening course survey, data on eye color and gender were collected from students enrolled in an introductory statistics course at a large university over a recent four year period. Biologically, eye color and gender are independent traits. However, in the data collected from our students, there is a statistically significant dependence between the two variables. In this article, we present two ideas for using this data set in the classroom, and explore the potential reasons for the dependence between the two variables in the population of our students.
  • The Evidence for Efficacy of HPV Vaccines: Investigations in Categorical Data Analysis

    Alison Gibbs & Emery Goossens, University of Toronto
    Tuesday, March 18, 2014 - 12:00pm ET
    Our current students are among the first to have been vaccinated against HPV. Have they ever considered how the accumulation of the evidence for the efficacy of the vaccine resulted in recommendations for its widespread provision? Using data sourced from a meta-analysis of clinical trials for HPV vaccines, we will examine this evidence. We will show how these data can be used to illustrate applications of methods of categorical data analysis, for students in courses at a variety of levels. And we will describe how this case study can be used to promote discussion of concepts in the design of experiments, statistical concerns such as independence of observations, and the importance of context in the interpretation of the results of data analyses.
  • Discovery Projects in Statistics: Implementation Strategies and Examples of Student Projects

    Brad Bailey & Dianna Spence, University of North Georgia
    Tuesday, February 18, 2014 - 12:00pm ET
    In this presentation we will discuss student-directed discovery projects in statistics, which are intended as the means through which statistical content is taught to the students. In particular, we will delineate the purpose and scope of a project covering linear regression analysis and another project covering comparisons with basic t-tests. We will describe curriculum materials developed to help instructors facilitate such projects and provide the web address where these materials can be accessed. We will give examples of how instructors use the curriculum materials to guide students through the projects' stages. In particular, the materials can be used to provide the students with clear information about the project requirements and what activities the students are expected to be engaged in during each phase of the student-directed projects. These projects are truly student-directed in that the students select their own research topic, define their own variables, and devise and carry out their own data collection plan before analyzing and interpreting their data. The students report their results in two forms: a written report is provided to the instructor and a brief formal presentation is made before the rest of the class. In both formats, the students report the findings of their research project, as well as explain why they chose the particular research topic, explain how they gathered, organized and analyzed the data and list any short-comings they perceive in their own project. Our presentation will include specific examples of projects that students have conducted. Finally, we will also discuss the rationale for assigning such projects, including the potential benefits of such projects - benefits suggested by both prior and on-going research - and possible factors mediating those benefits.
  • Primarily Statistics: Developing an Introductory Statistics Course for Pre-service Elementary Teachers

    Jennifer L. Green, Montana State University and Erin E. Blankenship, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 3:30pm ET
    We developed an introductory statistics course for pre-service elementary teachers. In this webinar, we will describe the goals and structure of the course, as well as the assessments we implemented. Overall, the course aims to help pre-service teachers recognize the importance of statistics in the elementary curriculum, as well as the integral role they, as teachers, can play in a student's entire statistical education.
  • Does My Baby Really Look Like Me? Using Tests for Resemblance to Teach Topics in Categorical Data Analysis

    Amy G. Froelich & Dan Nettleton, Iowa State University
    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    Many new parents have heard claims of a striking resemblance between them and their babies. As parents ourselves, we were skeptical of such claims so we devised a study to objectively answer the question "Does my baby really look like me?" In this webinar, we will present a study to test whether neutral observers perceive a resemblance between a parent and a child. We will demonstrate the general approach with two parent/child pairs (Amy and her daughter and Dan and his son) using survey data collected from introductory statistics students serving as neutral observers. We will then present ideas for incorporating the study design process, data collection, and analysis into different statistics courses.
  • The "Core Concepts Plus" Paradigm for Creating an Electronic Textbook for Introductory Business and Economic Statistics

    M. Ryan Haley, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
    Monday, November 18, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    This paper describes a textbook -development paradigm that has the flexibility to meet the specific needs of a department, college, and surrounding business community, while simultaneously lowering costs for students, facilitating the transition from intro-level to mid- and upper-level courses, preserving professor-specific preferences over course content and structure, increasing the quality and uniformity of the curriculum, overcoming difficulties of traditional rental programs, enhancing the professional development and teaching ability of professors, and improving student learning outcomes.
  • Distinguishing Between Binomial, Hypergeometric, and Negative Binomial Distributions

    Jacqueline Wroughton, Northern Kentucky University
    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    In this webinar I will discuss the development and assessment of an activity used in an introductory calculus-based statistics course to distinguish between these three discrete distributions. Students from the assessment were students in one of these courses.
  • Using fun in the statistics classroom: An exploratory study of college instructors' hesitations and motivations

    Lawrence Lesser, The University of Texas at El Paso; Rob Carver, Stonehill College; and Patricia Erickson, Taylor University; on behalf of the paper's 11-author team
    Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    In this webinar, we discuss the rationale and results for an exploratory survey on (N = 249) statistics instructors' use of fun, including their motivations, hesitations, and awareness of resources. Respondents were attendees at the 2011 United States Conference on Teaching Statistics and 16 completed phone interviews after the conference.
  • A Study of Faculty Views of Statistics and Student Preparation Beyond an Introductory Class

    Kirsten Doehler & Laura Taylor; Elon University
    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    Our presentation will highlight the needs in statistics education from the perspective of client disciplines based on the use of statistics in teaching and research in various academic affiliations. This information will cultivate discussion on how to use the information to guide curriculum development in introductory statistics. As a result of this study, a large data set was compiled that can be used in the classroom for students to explore. A demonstration of how to access and use the data set in class will be given.
  • Teaching Principles of One-Way Analysis of Variance Using M&M's Candy; The Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository: Examples and more Examples

    Todd Schwartz, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm ET
    Teaching Principles of One-Way Analysis of Variance Using M&M's Candy I present an active learning classroom exercise illustrating essential principles of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods. The exercise is easily conducted by the instructor and is instructive (as well as enjoyable) for the students. This is conducive for demonstrating many theoretical and practical issues related to ANOVA and lends itself to multiple possible configurations of ANOVA results, leading to rich classroom discussion and deeper student understanding of real-world applications of the methods. The Cleveland Clinic Statistical Education Dataset Repository: Examples and more Examples Examples are highly sought by both students and teachers. This is particularly true as many statistical instructors aim to engage their students and increase active participation. While simulated datasets are functional, they lack real perspective and the intricacies of actual data. Described is the creation of a new web-based statistical educational resource. This growing dataset repository presents raw data from real medical studies and offers (a) a vignette summarizing the study, research question and study design; (b) a data dictionary with clear documentation of variables and codes; (c) a complete citation for the associated study publication; and (d) a variety of data formats compatible with the majority of statistical packages.

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