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Webinars

  • Developing K-12 Teachers' Understanding of Statistics

    Tim Jacobbe, University of Florida
    Saturday, April 18, 2015 - 2:00pm
    Expectations for teaching statistics have been increased without adequately addressing teachers' preparation. This session will share results from teachers' performance on the NSF-funded LOCUS assessments as well as identify resources that may be used in training teachers during preparation and professional development programs.
  • Statistics and Society: Updating the curriculum of an introductory statistical literacy course for the modern student

    Ellen Gundlach, Purdue University
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 - 2:00pm
    Strategies for including important (and sometimes controversial), modern issues from society into an introductory statistical literacy course for liberal arts students will be discussed, including several projects which have been successfully used for 500 students split between large-lecture traditional, fully online, and flipped sections. Topics include advertisement analysis, big data, ethics, social media article discussions, and a service learning project. These new topics and projects capture student interest and show them how relevant statistical literacy is to their daily lives.
  • Teaching precursors to data science in introductory and second courses in statistics

    Nicholas J. Horton, Professor of Statistics, Amherst College
    Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 2:00pm
    Statistics students need to develop the capacity to make sense of the staggering amount of information collected in our increasingly data-centered world. Data science is an important part of modern statistics, but our introductory and second statistics courses often neglect this fact. This webinar discusses ways to provide a practical foundation for students to learn to “compute with data” as defined by Nolan and Temple Lang (2010), as well as develop “data habits of mind” (Finzer, 2013). We describe how introductory and second courses can integrate two key precursors to data science: the use of reproducible analysis tools and access to large databases. By introducing students to commonplace tools for data management, visualization, and reproducible analysis in data science and applying these to real-world scenarios, we prepare them to think statistically in the era of big data.
  • The Wikipedia Makeover: Spreading Stat Ed's Joy and Wisdom

    Ethan Brown, University of Minnesota
    Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 1:00pm
    Wikipedia's page on Statistics Education gets hundreds of hits every week, but until recently the page gave a very limited impression of our discipline. A group at the University of Minnesota has been regularly meeting since fall 2012 to research, update, and improve the Wikipedia coverage of statistics education. We have only begun to scratch the surface of Wikipedia's power to collect and widely disseminate the what, when, who, where, and why of teaching and learning statistics. Come hear about what we've done so far, and how you can get involved in spreading the word about the resources available to statistics educators worldwide.
  • Sampling Variability: A hot topic in the Common Core

    Anna Bargagliotti (for the Project-SET team), Loyola Marymount University
    Tuesday, June 10, 2014 - 12:00pm
    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) include much more statistics content than previous standards. Their adoption has created the opportunity and necessity for nearly all middle school and high school mathematics teachers to be prepared to teach a substantial amount of statistics. This session will focus on the topic of sampling variability, a topic that is greatly emphasized in the middle and high school grades in the CCSS. We will present a research-based learning trajectory to help guide teacher preparation on this topic. In addition, we will discuss several unexpected misconceptions that emerged while testing the trajectory with high school teachers. As a group, we will work through an activity together to illustrate how to use the trajectory with teachers.
  • Developing New Statistics Instructors and Student Leaders Through Peer Mentoring

    Aimee Schwab & Erin Blankenship; University of Nebraska, Lincoln
    Tuesday, March 11, 2014 - 4:00pm
    Like many other research universities, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln relies on graduate student instructors to cover a large portion of the instructional load in the introductory course. In order to better prepare new graduate student instructors, we have implemented a mentoring program that pairs new GTAs with experienced graduate student instructors. Through the mentoring program, the new GTA has a semester to acclimate to graduate school and their new role as instructor, and the senior GTA has the opportunity to emerge as a teacher leader.
  • Strategies for successful implementation of collaborative student assessment in face-to-face and online statistics classes

    Audbjorg Bjornsdottir, University of Minnesota
    Tuesday, February 11, 2014 - 12:00pm
    This presentation will be about collaborative tests, where students are allowed to work together during the exam. It will include a review about the effectiveness and different formats of collaborative tests along with successful strategies for implementing them in face-to-face and online statistics classes.
  • Investing in the Next Generation through Innovative and Outstanding Strategies (INGenIOuS): Report of outcomes from a recent workshop

    A. John Bailer, Miami University
    Tuesday, January 14, 2014 - 12:00pm
    The need for a larger proportion of the workforce to enter well equipped with mathematics and statistics skills has been acknowledged in a number of recent reports. To address this need, action must be taken by all stakeholders involved in preparing students for 21st century workforce demands. A collaboration of mathematics and statistics professional societies recently culminated in a workshop focused on identifying strategic steps that might be taken to dramatically increase the flow of mathematical sciences professionals into the workforce pipeline.
  • Updating the Guidelines for Undergraduate Programs in Statistics

    Nicholas J. Horton, Amherst College
    Tuesday, November 12, 2013 - 12:00pm
    Undergraduate study of statistics has been growing in recent years, with the number of students completing stats majors in the United States doubling in the past 5 years. At the same time, the amount and complexity of data being collected increases almost without bound. What should students completing undergraduate majors, minors or concentrations in statistics learn in order to help analyze this flood of information? The American Statistical Association endorsed guidelines in this area in 2000, and a workgroup is now considering what needs to be changed and amplified from the earlier report and supporting materials. In this webinar, participants will hear more about the process, learn about and identify key issues to be considered, and have the opportunity to make suggestions about areas and topics to explore.
  • Connecting Research to Practice in Statistics Education

    Dennis Pearl, The Ohio State University
    Tuesday, September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm
    This webinar will describe the motivation and summarize the major points of a recently released report on connecting research and practice in statistics education. The report seeks to foster productivity and coherence in statistics education research by providing a portal to the statistics education literature, guidance on important priorities in the field, and the impetus for development and wide use of instruments needed to address fundamental questions in the field.

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