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General

  • America is shamefully inadequate at teaching statistics. A student can travel from kindergarten to a Ph.D. without ever encountering the subject. Yet statistics are ubiquitous in life, and so should be statistical reasoning.

    Alan S. Blinder (1945 - )

  • Clue Clue
    dome maiden
    said rule anger
    level curb maples
    meet irises rain cave
    true oil cool terrain
    next premise tour skis
    salsa request fenced icon
    its logic in a limbo
    poisons persona
    dust tents trap oily bib

    Statistics Anagrams!

    Directions: Rearrange the letters of each clue's word or phrase to form a statistical word or phrase. For example, the word "name" can be rearranged to form the word "mean."

    Solutions (PDF)

  • by Lawrence Mark Lesser and Dennis K. Pearl

    A
    Better
    Confidence:
    Data.
    Expectations
    Fit
    Good.
    Hypothesizing,
    I
    Jettison
    Kurtosis,
    Leptokurtic
    Moments.
    Normality
    Obliges
    Parameters.
    Qualification:
    Rejecting
    Significance,
    Testing
    Uniform
    Variance
    While
    X-bars
    Yield
    Z-scores.

  • by Maarten Manhoff (1972 - )

    Nothing is not, said he,
    The absence of anything.
    Why so?, said she.
    Because, said he,
    Recall Aristotle?
    Well no, said she.
    It's so subtle, said he.
    There are two varieties
    Of empty cells, you see,
    Empty of necessity
    And empty accidentally, said he.
    Uh?, said she,
    I don't get it.
    It's Nothing, said he,
    Forget it.

  • written as part of class project at St. Olaf College
    ("World of chaos" by Carolyn Raitt; "Reality bites" by Hannah Johnson; "Is it you or me" by Nicole Villa)

    World of chaos
    How can I find truth in here?
    Stats gives life order.

    Reality bites
    Whipping data into shape
    Statistics bites back

    Is it you, or me?
    Your hopes, my size - both too big
    Love, your p-value

  • by Anthony Masci
    The stats prof thought that he was drinking Guinness just like Gosset did
    but it turned out to be Poisson liquid.

    When his students heard they became Hypergeometric
    and rather non-parametric.
    They couldn't believe that it was true,
    but the old professor managed to pull through!

    "So they made a type-I error," said he,
    and they all ate a dinner of Tukey and gravy.

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