Nonparametric Techniques

  • "The purpose of this electronic service is to provide access to a collection of datasets suitable for teaching statistics. The datasets are stored either locally or on other computers throughout the world. The datasets have been organized by statistical technique to make it easier for you to find a dataset appropriate for your pedagogical needs. When a dataset is appropriate for several statistical techniques, it will appear under several categories. Each dataset consists of three files: one is a description of the data; the others are an ascii (text) file of the data and an Excel file of the data."
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  • This is an e-book tutorial for R. It is organized according to the topics usually taught in an Introductory Statistics course. Topics include: Qualitative Data; Quantitative Data; Numerical Measures; Probability Distributions; Interval Estimation; Hypothesis Testing; Type II Error; Inference about Two Populations; Goodness of Fit; Analysis of Variance; Non-parametric methods; Linear Regression; and Logistic Regression.
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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting Blacksmiths Taking a Drink by Jean Francois Raffaelli (1884) with the statistical caption "Looks like Kolmogorov-Smirnoff testing." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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  • This is a collection of notes that covers many topics typically included in introductory and/or intermediate statistics courses. The notes are in PDF format, and each is followed by a set of exercises (with most answers included). The site also includes some tables and a link to a StatTable calculator.
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  • A movie frame given the statistical caption "Kolmogorov-Smirnov test: many think its still the best, especially for a non-parametric mood." This is part of a collection of statistical captions to accompany art work written by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel that took first place in the cartoon & art category of the 2009 A-Mu-sing contest sponsored by CAUSE. The collection and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. The still shot came from the 1959 movie "Our Man in Havana" starring Alec Guinness and Ernie Kovacs. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.
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  • Every careful measurement in science is always given with the probable error... every observer admits that he is likely wrong, and knows about how much wrong he is likely to be. This is a quote by Welsh Mathematician and philosopher Bertrand A.W. Russell (1872 - 1970). The quote may be found in his 1931 book "The Scientific Outlook" and is also found on the science history website www.todayinsci.com
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  • This NSF funded project provides worksheets and laboratories for introductory statistics. The overview page contains links to 9 worksheets that can be done without technology, which address the topics of obtaining data, summarizing data, probability, regression and correlation, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals. The page also contains twelve laboratories that require the use of technology. Data sets are provided in Minitab format.
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  • A song describing how sample means will follow the normal curve regardless of how skewed the population histogram is, provided n is very large.
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  • Asked about the power of advertising in research surveys, most agree that it works, but not on them. A quote by British Journalist and author Eric Clark from his book "The Want Makers: Inside the World of Advertising", Penguin Books (1988) page 13.
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  • A cartoon that can be used in teaching about the efficiency of using simulation in statistics. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on an idea from Dennis Pearl (The Ohio State University). Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites.
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